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Dayton Public Schools
Liam Niemeyer / WYSO

The Dayton teachers union voted Thursday night to approve a new contract with Dayton Public Schools. The vote put an end to a tumultuous months-long negotiations process and prevented a planned teacher strike ahead of the new school year.

Hundreds of DEA members met Thursday night to ratify the contract deal at the Marriott Hotel in Dayton.

DPS teacher Rachel Horowitz says she was relieved when she learned an agreeement had been reached between the union and the district.

She’s excited to return to school on Tuesday.

WYSO Curious Looks At Racial Gap In Local Policing

Aug 11, 2017
Dayton residents chat with police during a Coffee With a Cop event at Benjamin's the Burger Master.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

On this installment of WYSO Curious, we tackle a question asked by Talis Gage, "Why don’t more black people become police officers?"

The nearly 1,100 members of the Dayton Education Association teachers union are expected to vote Thursday afternoon on a tentative contract deal. If the union approves the contract, it would put an end to months of tense negotiations with the Dayton Public Schools administration and avert a planned strike.

Negotiations ended overnight Thursday after more than 18 hours of talks, resulting in a collective bargaining agreement. Details have not yet been released.

The vote is scheduled for Thursday at the Dayton Marriott Hotel at 4:30 p.m. 

Darrell Dean
Basim Blunt / WYSO

In this installment from our series Just Ask: Talking About Disability, we hear from Darrell Dean, who works at a disability services organization in Dayton. Darrell is 45, and was diagnosed with Spina Bifida at birth. As WYSO’s April Laissle explains, at first, Darrell struggled to find a job after he graduated from high school.

Highlights from the interview include:

"There's nothing I can do about my disability. I've got it, you know. So I have to live with it. It doesn't bother me or anything. I just cope with it and go on.”

Karen Kasler

After years of big numbers, attendance at this year’s Ohio State Fair plummeted to its lowest number in 13 years.

During its 12-day run the fair brought in 801,031 people – the lowest number since 2004 and a 13 percent drop from last year.

Spokesperson Alicia Shoults says attendance fluctuates every year, but the breakdown of a Midway ride that left one person dead and several seriously injured was a factor. “I think that obviously, opening day’s tragic accident certainly contributed to that and accompanying that, the fact that the rides were closed for a few days.”

Levitt Pavilion Dayton
Friends of Levitt Pavilion Dayton

Construction is expected to begin in September on a new live music venue in downtown Dayton. The Levitt Pavilion project is moving forward after organizers Tuesday reached their $5 million capital-funding goal.

The project has also received funding and support from the city of Dayton, Montgomery county, foundations and corporate sponsors.

Sherrod Brown
WCPN

Democratic U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown is pushing back against a decision by the Pentagon to close an office overseeing key defense manufacturing programs in the Dayton area. The programs have been headquartered at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base for the last 30 years.

Department of Defense officials recently announced a plan to relocate more than a dozen jobs to the Pentagon.

Brown and other members of the House and Senate have sent a letter to DOD Secretary James Mattis urging him to keep oversight of the programs in Ohio.

President Barack Obama delivers remarks at an event to highlight "My Brother's Keeper," an initiative to expand opportunity for young men and boys of color, in the East Room of the White House, Feb. 27, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)
Obama White House Archives

U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) was in Springfield on Friday to kick-off a program designed to help boys and young men of color get ready for college and careers. 

The Ohio program is affiliated with a national program called “My Brother’s Keeper.” It was started by the Obama administration as a way to address educational opportunity gaps for young people in underserved communities around the country.

Sen. Brown has been a champion of the program - launching chapters in Dayton, Toledo, Mansfield, Lorain County and elsewhere in the state.

The Dutch manufacturer of a thrill ride that broke apart and killed an 18-year-old man at the Ohio State Fair says excessive corrosion on a support beam led to a "catastrophic failure."

KMG posted the memo dated Friday on its Facebook page Sunday that says company officials visited the accident site and conducted metallurgical tests.

The statement says the corrosion "dangerously reduced" the thickness on the wall of the beam holding a passenger gondola on the swinging and spinning ride. The company says the ride was 18 years old.

Welcome to WYSO Weekend, our weekly radio magazine.  Here's our list of stories on this week's program: 

With the threat of a teacher strike looming, parents of Dayton Public Schools students gathered Tuesday to come up with a Plan B.  DPS district officials say school will start as scheduled on August 15. But, many parents are still worried about how a strike could affect their kids.

A deadly ride malfunction at the Ohio State Fair last week has raised questions about ride oversight and inspections. From public radio station WOSU, Esther Honig has been looking around, and found regulations for rides vary widely from state to state.  

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