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On Wednesday, Montgomery County Sheriff Phil Plummer fielded questions from news agencies regarding seven pending civil rights lawsuits against the Montgomery County jail.

Plummer also pushed back against comments County Commissioner Dan Foley made at a February 7th news conference where Foley said he and fellow commissioners were concerned about allegations of civil rights violations and misconduct.

 

The University of Cincinnati says an internal investigation about whether two police officers lied during a former colleague's murder trial is on hold to protect the integrity of the retrial.

The school's vice president for safety and reform tells The Cincinnati Enquirer the investigation will wait because the officers probably will testify in Ray Tensing's second trial.

Tensing is scheduled for retrial in May over the July 2015 shooting of unarmed black motorist Sam DuBose. Tensing, who is white, said he feared being run over.

Statehouse News Bureau

A federal judge has refused to lift his order delaying Ohio's executions after declaring the state's new lethal injection process unconstitutional.

Magistrate Judge Michael Merz last month rejected Ohio's use of a sedative used in problematic executions in Arizona and Ohio.

The judge also barred Ohio from using drugs that paralyze inmates and stop their hearts.

Attorneys for Ohio's prison system asked the judge to lift the order, saying his decision would likely be overturned on appeal.

Robert Bly: Shaping American Literature

Feb 8, 2017
Robert Bly at Antioch College in 1968
The Record courtesy of Antiochiana / Antioch College

Poet Robert Bly visited Antioch College in 1968, the same year he won the National Book Award for a collection called The Light Around the Body.

Three Malayan tiger cubs were born on Friday, February 3, at the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden and are now being cared for in the Zoo’s nursery.
Cincinnati Zoo

Three Malayan tiger cubs are being cared for in the Cincinnati Zoo's nursery.

The zoo says the first-time mother's maternal instincts didn't kick in, raising the threat to the cubs that their body temperatures would get too low without their mother's warmth. The zoo says nursery staffers are keeping them warm and feeding them .

Mammals curator Mike Dulaney says such reactions aren't uncommon for first-time tiger mothers, and that they can be aggressive and harm their cubs.

The zoo expects the cubs to be playing in their outdoor habitat by early spring.

Today on WYSO Weekend, Dayton Youth Radio and commentary from the University of Dayton's Bob Brecha. We’ll serve up small helping of politics and later in the program, Bill Felker has this week’s Poor Will's Almanack. See full details below.

Demetrius Oglesby
Basim Blunt / WYSO

Today on Dayton Youth Radio we have a story from former Ponitz Career Technology Center student Demetrius Oglesby about trying to balanced his love for rap music with his schoolwork and chores. 

Hear Demetrius' music here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/slopes-feat.-shaftonbeats/id1194578995

Nearly one week after President Trump's executive order banning refugees from the United States for 120 days, Dayton's refugee resettlement agency has had to shift its priorities.

The agency was slated to resettle more than 60 refugees in the next 4 months, but those plans are now on hold following President Donald Trump’s freeze on refugee resettlement. Trump says the order’s purpose is to give the government time to reassess their vetting system.

Wittenberg University

Lydia Kisley, a 2010 Wittenberg University grad, was recently recognized in Forbes Magazine for her work in medical research.  The Ohio native and current post-doctoral fellow at University of Illinois made the magazine’s 30 Under 30 list, honoring young people for outstanding contribution to their fields.

“I was pretty surprised. Especially, my research is pretty basic science," she says. "I’ve done some projects looking at how proteins interact in your blood that has potential to be used in cancer treatments."

Citizens with the group Indivisible Springfield say they are concerned with some of President Trump’s actions in his first weeks in office. They’ve teamed up with the nonprofit Welcome Springfield, and plan to send a letter to officials calling for “bipartisan solutions that honor and respect the needs of the immigrants and refugees who have come to our nation and to Clark County, Ohio.”

 

Pam Dixon with Indivisible Springfield says its the right thing to do.

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