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Wright State University
K. Shimada/Wikimedia Commons

Wright State programs could be cut, and more than 100 employees could be let go under the university's upcoming Fiscal Year 2018 budget proposal. School officials are expected to release details of the plan at a finance committee meeting May 19.

As many as 120 employees could be let go, Wright State officials say.

Premier Health provider, Miami Valley Hospital
WYSO/Joshua Chenault

Officials with Dayton-based Premier Health say contract talks with UnitedHealthCare continue despite an ongoing dispute over terms. Unless an agreement is reached, nearly 70,000 Premier patients with insurance through UnitedHealth will have to find new in-network providers.

 

Negotiations recently broke down over a disagreement between UnitedHealthcare and Premier over a push by the insurance giant to rank hospitals and providers based on cost and quality. Premier officials say the tiered system discourages customers from using Premier providers.

Thousands of Ohio residents using subsidies to pay for federally-mandated health insurance could lose that funding.
Flickr/Creative Commons

The United States Senate will soon take up for consideration the GOP House bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

Under the American Health Care Act, states could seek waivers opting them out of some patient protections. The waivers would allow insurance companies to consider health status when deciding the cost of premiums -- and some patients could see premiums rise.  

April Laissle

More than 150 people attended an open house at the a Bellbrook Mosque over the weekend.

The event, hosted by the Islamic Society of Greater Dayton, was organized as part of an effort to increase dialogue and understanding among people of different faith traditions in the Miami Valley.

Beloved Community Project of Yellow Springs

The Beloved Community Project of Yellow Springs (BCPYS) is an organization that focuses on creating and maintaining inclusive communities and promoting and participating in nonviolent actions against oppressive systems

Rev. Aaron Saari is the founding director of BCPYS and in this interview with WYSO, he talks about the project's mission and gives the details on the upcoming event called #viablenonviolence.

*Organizers are asking those who attend the event to consider bringing a carry in dish to share with others during the opening community meal at 6pm.

Welcome to WYSO Weekend, our weekly radio news magazine. Check out the full program details below:

Emma Johnson
Basim Blunt / WYSO

This week on Dayton Youth Radio we have a story from Stivers student Emma Johnson whose learning about feminism and activism from her grandmother.

Emma Johnson is a student at Stivers School for the Arts. Special thanks Leslie Rogers and Eva Maksutis of the Creative Writing Magnet. Learn more at the school's website: http://www.stivers.org/

Dayton Youth Radio is supported by the Virginia W. Kettering Foundation and the Armotte Boyer Charitable Trust, Fifth Third Bank, Trustee.

Dear Mr. President: Environmental "Trumptastrophe"

May 11, 2017
Fairborn Dear Mr. President Raina Johnson public library
WYSO/Joshua Chenault

Dear Mr. President:

"The world I'm going to live in is going to have a good atmosphere."

Fairborn eight-year-old Raina Johnson, who likes Lego games and art, coined a phrase to describe the Trump administration's approach to environmental issues so far: "Trumptastrophe." 

Dear Mr. President asks what you want to say about your community, and what you want President Donald Trump to know about the Miami Valley. Submit your own letter by emailing it to wyso@wyso.org.  

About 50 people attended a Dayton Public Schools town hall meeting on Wednesday to discuss transportation issues. The district is dealing with a bus driver shortage that has caused buses to be frequently late or missing altogether.  

 

 

At the meeting, Superintendent Rhonda Corr laid out several solutions to the problem, including having seventh and eighth grade students take RTA buses to school instead of district buses. That suggestion prompted safety concerns from some parents and teachers.

 

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

Officials in Dayton plan to resume using cameras to catch drivers who run red lights, two years after dropping that practice to comply with Ohio restrictions and a legal battle.

The Dayton City Commission approved the program's restart in a 5-0 vote Wednesday.

City officials say speed detectors and red-light cameras will make the city safer. Police officials have said traffic crashes increased, and the number of traffic deaths doubled after the original red light cameras were removed.

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