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History Talk: Honduras, TPS, and U.S. Policy

Jun 15, 2018
via History Talk

The Trump administration has taken a hardline on immigration. News from the U.S. border that asylum seekers are being turned away, that parents are being separated from their children, and the termination of Temporary Protected Status for 57,000 Hondurans currently living in the U.S. has drawn widespread public attention. But why are people fleeing? What is life like in their home countries? And what role does the U.S. play in creating the conditions that spur migration?

Wesley Center To Celebrate Juneteenth This Weekend

Jun 15, 2018
People dance onstage at last year's Juneteenth Festival.
Wesley Community Center

June 19 marks the anniversary of the day slavery was abolished in 1865. Today, that anniversary is known as “Juneteenth". According to the Wesley Community Center’s Executive Director Yvette Kelly-Fields, the holiday started in Texas and is now a national holiday.

Jerry Kenney / WYSO

In the age of online advertising, some people still use the old-school method to promote stuff they want to buy and sell –– by posting on bulletin boards in laundromats, restaurants and other establishments. WYSO’s Bulletin Board Diaries brings you some of the stories behind these ads.

Today in the series, we meet 28 year-old, Cedarville resident Andy McFarlane. We found his business card at the Beans-n-Cream coffee shop downtown - listing him as a composer, arranger, and private music instructor.

Senior Voices: Dan Nagle

Jun 14, 2018
Dan Nagle
Senior Voices

This week on Senior Voices, we meet Dan Nagle. Dan and his family have lived in Dayton for generations. He attended Chaminade High School and the University of Dayton before a stint in the Army and law school at Georgetown. Last September, he shared his story with Dayton Metro Library volunteer interviewer, Linda Pitzer.

Transcript:

LINDA PITZER: Do you have a favorite thing about living in Dayton? Would you recommend it to other people?

April Laissle / WYSO

About 100 people rallied against the Trump Administration’s immigration policies at a protest Thursday in front of Representative Mike Turner’s office in downtown Dayton.  

Advocacy group Dayton Indivisible For All organized the so-called “We Belong Together” rally to denounce the separation of immigrant families seeking asylum at U.S. border crossings.

Premier Health and the University of Dayton say 42 groups and more than 600 people contributed more than 1,300 ideas for the fairgrounds redevelopment project.
fairgroundstofuture.org

Officials with Premier Health and the University of Dayton say the planned redevelopment of the former Montgomery County Fairgrounds site may take up to several decades. The two organizations that own the 38 acres of land have issued a joint statement saying it could take, “15 to 20 years to achieve the full vision,” of redevelopment.

A city program that transformed parking meters into brightly colored charitable donations sites has announced its collection totals from its first year of operation. Real Change Dayton launched last summer to help people struggling with homelessness and cut down on panhandling.

 

Already facing a severe labor shortage, landscaping businesses that can't keep up with booming demand for backyard patios and fire pits worry that an immigration raid that rounded up over 100 people last week will make it even tougher to persuade Congress to allow more foreign workers into America for seasonal jobs.

Clark State Community College

Clark State Community College will offer its first four-year degree starting next year.

 The college in Springfield announced recently that it has received state approval to offer a bachelor's degree in manufacturing technology management.

Clark State President Jo Alice Blondin says the program will allow people currently working in the manufacturing industry to learn new skills and prepare for advancement.

Updated 6:34 p.m. ET

An ideologically split U.S. Supreme Court Monday upheld Ohio's controversial "use-it-or-lose-it" voting law by a 5-to-4 margin. The law allows the state to strike voters from the registration rolls if they fail to return a mailed address confirmation form, and don't vote for another four years, or two federal election cycles.

Failure to vote

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