NCAA

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Dayton has been selected to host the men’s First Four NCAA basketball games from 2016-2018, continuing a  run as the host of the tournament tip-off games for a total of 18 consecutive years. NCAA committee chair Scott Barnes says the choice to keep the tournament's opening games in Dayton is a reflection of the city's passion for the game and past success as a First Four host.

“When you think about Dayton’s track record in hosting the First Four and the community and how they’ve embraced this event since its inception really, it’s just been remarkable,” he said.

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Ohio State University Archives

History Talk continues its exploration of the relationship between American university sports and the National Collegiate Athletic Association, or NCAA.

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Ohio State University Archives

How we debate college sports connects to a long history, dating all the way back to the Greeks and Romans.

Credit Chad Cooper / Flickr

The University of Dayton is preparing its bid to bring the NCAA First Four men’s basketball games back to Dayton. Last season, the Dayton Flyers went to the Elite Eight for the first time in 30 years. The First Four games and the Flyer’s recent success highlight the growing economic impact of UD basketball for the city. 

Chad Cooper / Flickr

The Dayton Flyers are headed to Memphis Thursday—and so are a bunch of excited University of Dayton fans. The Flyers will play Stanford in the Sweet Sixteen after two upset wins in the NCAA men’s basketball playoffs last week, the first time in 30 years the Flyers have made it that far in the playoffs.

 

Opening games of the NCAA men's basketball tournament return to southwest Ohio this year, but a Dayton street party marking the tournament's start will not.

The Dayton Daily News reports the party held in 2012 as the First Four Festival included food and music and drew about 15,000 people. Organizers canceled it last year, saying the NCAA no longer allowed local sponsorships of public events surrounding the tournament, but said they expected to have a festival again in 2014.

The NCAA’s First Four tournament kick off today at the University of Dayton Arena.  The games will open with less fanfare than they did a year ago but there’s still plenty of excitement surrounding them.

Absent this year from the NCAA tournament kickoff is a presidential visit and the big Oregon District street party that began last year, but this year’s First Four event has been sold out since last October. The tournament opening has a significant economic impact for the Dayton area.

An annual Dayton festival planned around the start of the NCAA men's basketball tournament has been canceled this year.

Organizers said it was necessary because the NCAA is no longer permitting local sponsorships of public events surrounding the tournament.

The Dayton Daily News reports that the First Four Festival in the city's historic Oregon District was planned for March 17. The University of Dayton Arena is the annual site of the tournament's opening game, a "play-in" contest between the two lowest-seeded teams.

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President Barack Obama and British Prime Minister David Cameron are attending the kick-off game of the NCAA Tournament in Dayton tomorrow night.  It’s one stop on the prime minister's official visit to the United States. The two world-leaders will be interviewed together at halftime.

Sportscaster Clark Kellogg will talk to them for CBS and Turner Sports during the "First Four" matchup between Mississippi Valley State and Western Kentucky on Tuesday night.

The game starts at 6:30 p.m. EDT.

President E. Gordon Gee says the Ohio State University should have asked more pointed questions as a memorabilia-for-cash scandal was first coming to light.

The NCAA last month hit Ohio State with a one-year bowl ban and additional penalties for violations that started with eight football players taking thousands of dollars in cash and tattoos. That was in exchange for jerseys, rings and other Buckeyes memorabilia.

Gee tells The Columbus Dispatch that the university has learned to back up its procedures by asking the right questions.

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