Nan Whaley

Nan Whaley is a Dayton City Commissioner and endorsed by the Democratic Party, who says the economy will be her focus if she's elected mayor. Whaley says she has plans to bring jobs through leveraging the city's assets and will restore blighted neighborhoods by tearing down unlivable properties. Whaley also says a welcoming, vibrant community will attract people here. Whaley sat down in an interview with Emily McCord April 18, 2013 ahead of the Mayoral Primary May 7th, where she faces incumbent Gary Leitzell and Democrat A.J. Wagner.

A.J. Wagner is a former Montgomery County court judge and county auditor. He says his experience is what distinguishes him as a candidate for Dayton mayor and hopes to win the primary in May, as he challenges incumbent Gary Leitzell and Democrat Nan Whaley. WYSO's Emily McCord is interviewing all the candidates to learn more about them and their positions.

On May 7th, Dayton residents will go to the polls and vote in the primary for city mayor. Independent incumbent Gary Leitzell will face two Democratic challengers, AJ Wagner and Nan Whaley. WYSO's Emily McCord  sat down with all three candidates to hear more about them and their positions and begins her series with Mayor Gary Leitzell.

Dayton’s plan to use aerial surveillance to address crime in the city has been shelved. City manager Tim Riordan says it will not pursue a $120 thousand contract with Persistant Surveillance Systems Inc., a company that would have provided manned aircraft to monitor crime above the city. Riordan made his remarks at Wednesday's commission meeting.

In a press release to WYSO, Tim Riordan says:

Juliet Fromholt

On Friday morning four new parks opened in downtown Dayton. They were small - about 200 square feet- and they were in the street. That's because September 17th was PARK(ing) Day. Dayton joined cities around the world participating in the grassroots movement that transforms metered parking spots into mini green spaces for one day only.

Here's how it works: people around the world pick a metered parking spot in their community. They feed the meter all day to rent the spot which gets transformed into a small park.

A parking spot outside the Ludlow Street entrance of City Hall will be covered in grass and plants. But it's only from 7:30 am until five-thirty in the afternoon. The plants are donated, and the City isn't spending any public funds to participate.

September 17th is Parking Day. It's a global grassroots movement that transforms meter parking spots into mini green spaces for one day. This year several Dayton organizations will be participating including City Hall.