Montgomery County

This week at WYSO we’ve been talking about the future of manufacturing. A lot of area manufacturers say the business is growing, but they need better-trained young people to carry the torch. They aren’t the only employers struggling to fill job openings, despite high unemployment in the region. So why are so many young people falling through the cracks?

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Montgomery County will hold a forum on workforce development Tuesday from 5:30pm-7:30pm at Sinclair Community College. Area employers and educators will discuss the need for a “talent pipeline” to address a perceived gap between workforce training for young people and available jobs in a changing market.

Local officials want talented young people to be channeled from school, to internships and apprenticeships, to jobs and careers.

Katie McNeil with Miami Machine Corporation is one of many employers who see a growing skills gap as older workers retire.

As in past years, new or additional taxes and levies for Miami Valley school districts proved more difficult to pass than renewals. Almost all renewals passed, with the exception of Jefferson Township, which defeated a renewal levy for the schools' operating expenses.

Montgomery County's other levies were a mixed bag with many tight margins for additional levies. Centerville, Kettering, Oakwood and Vandalia-Butler all passed additional levies, while Brookville and Huber Heights both defeated levies; in Huber Heights the margin was particularly wide.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

A new branch of southwest Ohio’s bikeway system has opened in Miami Township, linking the Great Miami River Bikeway to Austin Boulevard near I-75. The bike trails are part of a regional vision for economic development.

At the blustery ribbon-cutting ceremony for the Medlar Bikeway, officials from Montgomery County, Miamisburg, Miami Township and Five Rivers Metroparks cheered and posed for pictures.

Steve Stanley, head of the Montgomery County Transportation Improvement District, said cycling options support economic growth.

WYSO/Lewis Wallace

Six Montgomery County school districts have new tax levies on the ballot this November, some for the third, fourth or fifth time. But many homeowners oppose any new taxes, citing losses in property values and the overall post-recession fiscal squeeze among reasons to vote against new levies.

(WYSO/Lewis Wallace)

 

 Montgomery County voted on Tuesday to put $50,000 towards a Great Miami River master plan. More than a dozen cities and towns along the river are also pitching in to match funds provided by a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for a program that helps states plan waterfront development.

The local partnership with the Corps is headed off by the Miami Conservancy District, and participants hope it will help turn the river into a regional cash cow.

 A report out Sunday says the labor market in Ohio is tough—and not improving as fast as the rest of the country. But some Dayton-area officials have a brighter outlook.

The report, from left-leaning organization Policy Matters Ohio, says jobs, especially well-paying ones, are slow to return to the state. Unemployment has leveled out around 7 percent, but many people continue to leave the labor force completely.

Montgomery County has recommended funding for seven projects totaling nearly 7 million dollars. The grants are expected to bring in over 400 jobs to the area.

According to reports, more than 200 people showed up last night at the Miami Township Board of Trustees meeting in Montgomery County. At issue is the fate of the Miami Twp. Police Department.

The local fraternal order of Police say they were told the township was considering contracting out Police Services to Montgomery County.  At last night’s meeting, it appears the Trustees put those fears to rest, saying they never pursued contracting with Montgomery County, and they were focused on securing funding for existing police force.

Authorities in Dayton are more concerned about large-capacity magazines than assault weapons that are the subject of debate in Washington.

Last year there were 27 homicides in Dayton, with handguns the preferred weapon and just one case involving an assault rifle. Most of the handguns had large-capacity magazines.

The sheriff in Montgomery County says it has investigated more homicides involving frying pans in the past three years than assault weapons.

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