Medical Marijuana

The state announced a dozen marijuana-cultivation licenses for locations across Ohio.
Paige Filler on Flickr Creative Commons

In 2016, Ohio became the 25th state to legalize medical marijuana. Since then, the state has been trying to implement the program, but that process hasn’t been entirely smooth. Many local municipalities have been reluctant to get on board.

WYSO’s April Laissle spoke with Wright State University political science professor Dr. Lee Hannah about the state’s progress and how a recent announcement by U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions may affect Ohio’s burgeoning medical marijuana industry.

The Ohio Department of Commerce recently awarded Cresco Labs one of a dozen highly competitive medical marijuana cultivation licenses.
Cresco Labs

The city of Huber Heights has passed a moratorium on medical marijuana. It’s the latest on a growing list of Miami Valley cities that have already passed their own bans following Ohio’s legalization of medical pot in 2016.

Huber Heights joins Beavercreek, Miamisburg, Oakwood, and Springboro in banning the cultivation and retail sale of medical marijuana within city limits. Huber Heights’ decision follows U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ recent proposal to change how the federal government handles legalized marijuana.  

Medications produced by Cresco Labs in Yellow Springs will be available to patients statewide as early as next summer through Ohio's new medical marijuana program.
Jess Mador / WYSO

Dozens of public officials and advocates gathered in Yellow Springs Thursday to break ground on Ohio’s first medical marijuana-cultivation site. The project is one of a dozen across Ohio licensed by the state just two weeks ago, and it moves forward amid questions over the fairness of state’s medical cannabis licensing process.

Statehouse News Bureau

State Auditor Dave Yost says questions about past drug convictions of a consultant who played a key role in Ohio’s new medical marijuana program, set to begin operation in September, need to be addressed now. He says it’s time for an investigation.

Yost says he’s troubled by reports that the consultant who graded applications from companies seeking licenses had drug convictions in his past.

“This is an epic fail. I’m outraged,” he said.

Yost questions how someone with those convictions could be hired by the state for $150,000 to do that work.

The state announced a dozen marijuana-cultivation licenses for locations across Ohio.
Paige Filler on Flickr Creative Commons

It's official: Yellow Springs will soon be home to a massive, environmentally friendly, medical-marijuana facility. Department of Commerce officials Thursday awarded medical marijuana-cultivation licenses to a dozen companies across the state.

Central State is one of two historically black universities in Greene County.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Central State University has applied to become a medical marijuana testing facility. The Wilberforce area university and Hocking College in Nelsonville were the only Ohio universities to apply for testing permits by the state’s deadline. If granted the license, Central State would be responsible for testing medical marijuana for safety before it’s sent out for wider distribution in Ohio.

The state announced a dozen marijuana-cultivation licenses for locations across Ohio.
Paige Filler on Flickr Creative Commons

  This week the village council of Yellow Springs voted to approve the sale of land to an Illinois-based medical marijuana growing facility. If the sale becomes final, Cresco Labs LLC would take possession of eight acres of land for the cultivation and processing of medical marijuana. The land sits near the current site of Antioch University, just off Dayton Yellow Springs Road.

medical marijuana
David Twain / Flickr Creative Commons

The state has authorized nearly two million dollars to be spent to set up the new medical marijuana program – which is supposed to take effect in less than three weeks.

The state announced a dozen marijuana-cultivation licenses for locations across Ohio.
Paige Filler on Flickr Creative Commons

An Ohio board that oversees attorney conduct says attorneys aren't allowed to help someone establish a legal medical marijuana-related business in the state because using, growing and selling marijuana remains a federal crime.

 The advisory opinion released Thursday by the state Supreme Court's Board of Professional Conduct also says Ohio attorneys aren't legally permitted to use medical marijuana.

On Monday, the Beavercreek city council passed a six-month ban on medical marijuana. The ordinance prohibits the city from granting any permits to grow, process, or sell marijuana until January. It doesn’t ban the use of medical marijuana at home.

 

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