Mayor Nan Whaley

Dayton Arcade Interior, 2013
Tom Gilliam /

Dayton City Commission has voted to put money towards upkeep for the historic downtown Dayton Arcade, and an out-of-state investor is joining in.

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

The city of Dayton will continue to use its traffic cameras, but will now only make citations when an officer is present. It’s part of an ongoing face-off with the state over the use of the speed and red light cameras.

In March, the state of Ohio created a law banning the use of traffic cameras to ticket drivers, unless a police officer was on site.  

Several cities, including Dayton filed lawsuits against the state, saying the law violated "home rule" authority.

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

One provision that’s likely to stay in the final version of the state budget being worked on now is a proposal to deduct state money from cities still using traffic cameras. Officials in those affected cities are frustrated by the move. 

Traffic cameras are a topic that revs up contentious debate for Republicans and Democrats.  But last year, camera opponents prevailed and this March, a law took effect requiring cities to station police officers with cameras to observe violations. Cities say those cameras are important safety tools, and they sued.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley talked to supporters and colleagues after her second state of the city speech Wednesday.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley’s second state of the city address this Wednesday morning focused on the improving economy, and the mayor’s agenda for education and city services. Whaley touted the boom in downtown housing, a drop in crime rates, and shouted out businesses and microbreweries that have opened up.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley's City of Learners committee officially released its action plan.
City of Dayton Website

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley’s City of Learners committee has released its action plan.

The plan was developed over a year with help from more than 70 educators and leaders.  

The City of Learners committee wants to see more kids in preschool, internships with area businesses, and new afterschool and summer programs.

Mayor Nan Whaley says Dayton Public Schools also needs to focus on recruitment and retention of quality teachers.

The race track at the north Dayton racino under construction in 2014. Racino owner Penn National can't agree with the state of Ohio on a relocation payment to the city of Dayton.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The mayor of Dayton says the state needs to act soon to get the city a $500,000 racino payment it’s owed by law. The money got hung up at the very end of the recent lame-duck session, when Governor John Kasich vetoed a line-item amendment to a bill that resolved a long-standing dispute over the money.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley announced the hire of Warren Price as Dayton's new city manager. His first day is Jan. 12.
Ariel Van Cleave / WYSO

Dayton has a new city manager. Warren Price will take over in January for current manager Tim Riordan, who's resigning after five years in the job.

Price has most recently been working in Canton, Ohio, with the Stark County Sheriff’s Department, where he served as general counsel and human resources director. But before that he was Canton’s director of public safety and public service as well as the city’s chief of staff for about four years.

Uber has been criticized for competing with taxi cabs without being subject to the same regulation.
Al Fed / Flickr/Creative Commons

The city of Dayton has unanimously amended its taxi and transportation ordinance to regulate Uber and other new transportation network services for the first time. UberX is an app-based ride service that’s been controversial in some cities in part because it competes with taxis, but isn’t regulated the same way.

A controversy could be fizzling out over whether Dayton will host immigrant children from Central America in temporary shelters. The federal government told Mayor Nan Whaley it might not need the help, after all.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The city of Dayton and the Dayton Regional Transit Authority (RTA) have announced they’re extending the hours for student bus passes. Student bus passes have only been good through 4:30pm; now a $30 monthly pass will last until 5pm, and the $40 pass will be good through 7pm on weekdays.

The city has found transportation is a problem for a lot of kids who want to participate in tutoring and other after-school activities.