Matt Joseph


This week Dayton will recognize the 20th anniversary of the Dayton Peace Accords, which ended the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina in 1995. Events in the area will include a visit by former President Bill Clinton on Thursday.

MarkDonna / Creative Commons/Wikipedia

Four Candidates are vying for two seats on the Dayton City Commission in Tuesday’s election.


The one incumbent candidate—Democrat Matt Joseph—is hoping for a fourth term on the commission. He touts Dayton’s recovery as one of the commission’s achievements but says there’s still more to be done.


On Tuesday, voters will see five names on the primary ballot for Dayton City Commissioner.

The incumbent candidate, City Commissioner Matt Joseph, says the eleven years he’s been in office have been spent keeping Dayton on course amid economic downturns and job losses, but he believes more jobs can be created.

“We need to put every resource we can toward helping out entrepreneurs; you know making sure there’s support of business climate, making sure that there are mentors available to help those folks who are starting up,” the current commissioner said.

jaime.silva / Flickr/Creative Commons

The city of Dayton and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base have announced plans for the 20th anniversary of the Dayton Peace Accords, the agreement signed in Dayton on November 21, 1995 that ended the war in Bosnia, Herzegovina and Croatia and established Bosnia and Herzegovina’s current constitution.

City Commissioner Matt Joseph says it was hard for a lot of people on the ground at the time to believe the war would really end with these accords, and the fact that it worked was almost a surprise.

Dayton City Commission's Incumbents Re-Elected

Nov 9, 2011

Updated 11:00 AM

Voters in Montgomery County chose incumbents for two open seats on the Dayton City Commission. Dean Lovelace and Matt Joseph each earned more than 36% of the vote. First-time candidate Mark Manovich took 15% and William Pace came in fourth with 11%.

Matt Joseph has been in office for eight years, but he acknowledges that being an incumbent doesn’t mean an automatic win.