LGBT

Sarah Caplan/WYSO

On Saturday, June 7th, 2014, The Dayton Gay Men's Chorus will present the Dayton premiere of an oratorio that reflects the life of Harvey Milk, the first elected openly gay man to hold public office in California. The work, composed by Tony nominated Andrew Lippa, weaves elements of Milk's life, from childhood to his assassination in November of 1978. 

A federal judge has ordered Ohio authorities to recognize the marriages of gay couples performed in other states.  Judge Timothy Black's ruling on Monday criticized the state's "ongoing arbitrary discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation."

He says the state's marriage recognition bans are unconstitutional and unenforceable.

Rick Cauthen and his partner of nine years, were married in New York in 2012. He says when they had their taxes done this year, it was a reminder that Ohio considers their marriage invalid.

The group that’s pushing a same-sex marriage amendment in Ohio says it’s retooling the language because of concerns about religious institutions.

Ian James of Freedom Ohio says language about recognition of same-sex marriages by religious institutions has been taken out, and that the group will start circulating the new petitions as soon as possible. But he says they still have the signatures they need to put the original issue on the ballot with a filing deadline of July 2.

User Stéfan / Flickr/Creative Commons

A new poll finds that Ohioans are closely divided when it comes to gay marriage. A Quinnipiac  University poll released Monday shows that 50 percent of Ohio voters support gay marriage while 44 percent are against it.

The survey also finds that Ohio voters under age 30 overwhelmingly back the idea while those 65 and older opposed it.

Gay marriage supporters are working to put the issue back on the Ohio ballot in November. There also have been recent lawsuits aimed at seeking the recognition of gay marriage in Ohio.

If a same sex couple who is married in another state has a child together, only one parent’s name can be listed on an Ohio birth certificate. Now a lawsuit has been filed that would change that.

Cincinnati Attorney Al Gerhardstein says it is unfair that two heterosexual married parents of a child can have both of their names listed on a birth certificate yet two married homosexual parents have to choose just one name to put on that document.

LGBT Group Faces Tolerance, If Not Always Acceptance, At Catholic University of Dayton

Jan 6, 2014

Each semester, the WYSO News Department mentors journalism classes at Miami University and features the best story from each term on our website.

A group that is trying to put a ballot issue before voters next fall to allow them to overturn the state’s ban on gay marriage says a new poll shows most Ohioans will vote to pass it, but critics are not so sure that poll is accurate.

When Ian James of Freedom to Marry commissioned a recent poll, he had pollsters ask specific questions about the amendment his group wants to put on the ballot.  And he says the numbers in this poll show a majority of Ohioans are ready to pass the amendment his group is backing.

Press photo

The U.S. Senate passed a bill Thursday that bans workplace discrimination based on sexual orientation. Senator Rob Portman (R-Ohio) joined a handful of Republicans in the Senate to support the measure.

The Employment Non-Discrimination Act, or ENDA, would prohibit employers from hiring, firing or promotion practices based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Portman joined the Democratic majority to back the bill, but only after his amendment was added that exempted religious employers from ENDA.

A federal judge who recently ordered the out-of-state marriages of two gay couples to be recognized in Ohio has infuriated some conservatives who say he should be impeached.

Judge Timothy Seymour Black's ruling in favor of the two couples comes despite a statewide constitutional ban on gay marriage.

The two couples, each struggling with the death, sued state authorities to have their marriages recognized on death certificates.

A lawsuit seeking to have the marriages of two gay couples recognized on death certificates has been expanded to include all similarly situated couples in Ohio, despite a statewide gay marriage ban.

Attorneys are asking a federal judge to require Ohio's health department to order all funeral directors and coroners in the state to list gay clients as married if they were legally wed in other states.

Judge Timothy Black approved a request to expand the lawsuit Wednesday.

Pages