LGBT

Dayton is banning its employees from non-essential government travel to Mississippi and North Carolina, saying recent laws passed in the two states discriminate against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people.

A Thursday memo from Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley forbids city dollars paying for non-essential travel to the states.

The Dayton Daily News reports Whaley said the new laws conflict with the city's values and anti-discrimination ordinances enacted by city commissioners.

Ohio's most populous county is banning its employees from non-essential government travel to North Carolina after that state enacted a law prohibiting communities from passing ordinances to protect the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people.
 
Cuyahoga County Executive Armond Budish said Wednesday that the ban is in effect until North Carolina repeals or amends its law on bias ordinances. Budish's statement says the county, which includes Cleveland, has adopted a plan that "ensures equal treatment" for the LGBTQ community.
 

User Stéfan / Flickr/Creative Commons

Authorities in Ohio have resisted including lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender people to those covered by state hate crime laws.

Ohio is among 14 states that lack a hate-crime law that covers both sexual orientation and gender identity. Federal law gives individuals legal protection for bias-motivated acts that are based on those factors. But state law takes precedence if the crime doesn't pose a threat to interstate or foreign commerce.

Jerry Kenney

On Friday night, a group will gather on Courthouse Square in Dayton to remember people whose lives have been lost to “anti-transgender violence.” 

This is the first year Dayton has joined the national Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR). The event will begin at 7 p.m. A proclamation from Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley  will be read then several transgender speakers will address the crowd, including Dan Miyake of Dayton.

Neon Movies

The Dayton LGBT Film Festival celebrates its 10th anniversary this year and to find out about this year’s selections, we spoke once again with Jonathan McNeil, manager at the Neon Movies in downtown Dayton.

McNeil says festival passes sold out quickly this year but individual tickets are still available for all shows.  Friday night's ticket stub will get you into an expanded after-party at Gilly's nightclub following the movie.

Asha Brogan / WYSO

It's hard enough being the token. Being the ignored token is even worse.

Being a Black Queer Dude is interesting. Growing up, I'd hear "Gay!? Black people aren't gay, that's a white thing." I don't think I ever understood that.

User Stéfan / Flickr/Creative Commons

Same-sex couples in Ohio can hold their weddings in the Statehouse, file their state taxes jointly and list their spouses on death certificates.

Those are among the changes following the U.S. Supreme Court's decision last month that legalized gay marriage across the country.

The lead plaintiff in the case that led to the ruling was Jim Obergefell of Cincinnati. He sued Ohio's health director for refusing to list him as the surviving spouse on his husband's death certificate.

Now that gay marriages are allowed, the state is working to comply with the ruling.

Ohio Court: Minister Changes Stance On Gay Weddings

Jul 15, 2015

A northern Ohio minister who would not marry a gay couple while on duty at a county courthouse has apparently changed his stance.

Court officials in Toledo say the minister performed two same-sex marriages late last week.

The Rev. John Oliver had refused to marry a gay couple on the day in June when the U.S. Supreme Court legalized gay marriage across the country.

A court administrator tells The Blade newspaper in Toledo that the three ministers at the Lucas County Courthouse are not county employees.

States cannot keep same-sex couples from marrying and must recognize their unions, the Supreme Court says in a ruling that for months has been the focus of speculation. The decision was 5-4.

Justice Anthony Kennedy, seen as a pivotal swing vote in the case, wrote the majority opinion. All four justices who voted against the ruling wrote their own dissenting opinions: Chief Justice John Roberts and Justices Antonin Scalia, Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito.

LGBT Center Dayton

Starting Friday, June 5th, the Dayton LGBT Center and other groups will host a series of events during the city's annual gay pride celebration. The events will continue through Sunday.  In this interview with WYSO's Jerry Kenney, LGBT Center board member RJ McKay gives details on each event and talks about how the event continues to grow in Dayton each year.

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