WYSO

juvenile crime

Ohio Department of Youth Services

The Ohio Department of Youth Services is free of federal court oversight for the first time in nearly a decade. The monitoring came after a lawsuit was filed in federal court alleging mistreatment of juveniles. As part of the settlement, the state agreed to improve conditions for kids in their care.

 

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The Ohio Supreme Court has adopted an administrative rule that would restrict the use of shackles on juveniles during court proceedings.
 
The amendment to court rules would require judges to begin with the premise that shackles aren't needed.
 
Judges could restrain juveniles on a case-by-case basis if a judge deems their behavior a threat or they're at risk of fleeing. The judge also would have to determine whether less restrictive alternatives exist.
 

A boy has been sentenced for raping a fellow teen who was drunk at a party after a high school football game in southwest Ohio.
 
Warren County Judge Joseph Kirby in Lebanon sentenced the boy to a minimum of a year in a rehabilitation program. The teen could face at least a year in juvenile detention if he does not complete the program.
 

Dayton Mediation Center In A Growth Spurt

Dec 26, 2013

Disagreements with neighbors or spouses can be ugly, and they can also be costly for the people and institutions involved. The Dayton Mediation Center has been working for 27 years to stem the social and fiscal costs of conflict by addressing it at its root, using volunteer mediators. The center works closely with neighborhood groups and the Montgomery County juvenile court to take on cases that might otherwise go through police, or result in either criminal charges or expensive litigation.

The Ohio Supreme Court is weighing whether to require juvenile offenders facing the possibility of detention to consult with an attorney before deciding to waive their right to a lawyer.

Current court rules don't require such a meeting. The proposal is pitting youth advocates against some judges who say the requirement hinders the rights of parents and juveniles to make the decision themselves.

Kim Tandy, executive director of the Children's Law Center in Covington, Ky., says too many children are going through the juvenile court system without legal representation.