Josh Mandel

According to the latest Rasmussen poll,  Republican challenger Josh Mandel now runs even with incumbent Democratic Senator Sherrod Brown in Ohio’s U.S. Senate race.  WYSO's Jerry Kenney has the details.

 

The telephone survey of likely voters in Ohio shows Mandel and Brown each earning 44% support.  Three percent surveyed favored some other candidate in the contest, and nine percent remain undecided.

In an email to supporters, Sarah Benzing, campaign manager for Friends of Sherrod Brown credited special interest money for Mandel’s rise in the polls.

Republican Senate candidate Josh Mandel plans to campaign across South and Eastern Ohio over the next two days.

His campaign says the Ohio treasurer plans to focus on energy policy in Appalachian Ohio visits.  His first stop is at a Georgetown restaurant, in Brown County.  Then he heads to Adams County, followed by other Southern and Eastern Ohio stops.  Some details were still being worked out earlier this week.

Incumbent U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown is taking on his Republican opponent's hiring practices at the state treasury in his first TV ad of the campaign.

U.S. Sen. and 2008 presidential nominee John McCain is endorsing a fellow military veteran from Ohio in the
race for U.S. Senate.

McCain visited Ohio on Monday to support Treasurer Josh Mandel. McCain says the 34-year-old Republican "represents the new generation of leadership" that the senator says is needed to control spending, improve the economy and boost national security.

Mandel is challenging incumbent Democrat Sherrod Brown. Brown's campaign criticizes Mandel's lack of experience and ill attention to his treasurer's job.

Republican State Treasurer Josh Mandel will take on Incumbent Democratic Senator Sherrod Brown this fall. Mandel easily won the G-O-P primary winning 62% percent of the total votes statewide.  On March 12, 2012, Florida Senator Marco Rubio campaigned in Ohio for the Senate hopeful. 

The following  audio contains addresses from Mandel and Rubio to a crowd of 300 in the Berry Room located  at Wright State University's Nutter Center. 

 

State Treasurer Josh Mandel and five other Republicans will face off in this year's Ohio GOP primary for U.S. Senate.

The state's top elections official on Thursday announced the list of Senate contenders who will appear on the March 6 primary ballots.

The winner of the 6-way Republican contest would likely face incumbent U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown, a Democrat, in November in one of the nation's most closely watched Senate races.

Democrat Mark McGinnis is listed as a write-in candidate challenging Brown.

 In the week’s edition of PoliticsOhio, Emily McCord speaks to Ohio Public Radio’s Karen Kasler. A progressive think tank alleges that public money is being used to fund a campaign to support Senate Bill 5. Kasler reports on how they have connected the dots and on whether or not the assertion has legs. Also, she touches on a new website launched this week by Treasuer Josh Mandel and on his chances of a Senate run.

Data on how much money state and local public employees make has been online for a while. But Ohio Public Radio’s Karen Kasler reports that data is getting a lot of new attention thanks to a link on a state officeholder's website.

Ohio Treasurer of State Website

COLUMBUS, Ohio - Ohio's junior senator is endorsing Republican state treasurer Josh Mandel in the 2012 race for U.S. Senate.

U.S. Sen. Rob Portman says in a statement released by Mandel on Tuesday said that he would provide the necessary focus on jobs and the economy. Portman says he has helped Mandel and will continue to do so.

Mandel faces former state Sen. Kevin Coughlin. So far, Coughlin is the only announced candidate in a GOP primary that will decide who faces incumbent Democrat Sherrod Brown.

Ohio Treasurer Josh Mandel is requesting an investigation into whether banks overcharged four of Ohio's five pension funds and the state's injured worker insurance fund for foreign currency services.

In a letter Tuesday to Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine, Mandel says banks may have manipulated exchange rates on foreign investments over the past dozen years, costing Ohio pensioners and businesses tens of millions of dollars.

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