JobsOhio

The flap over the state auditor’s authority to look over the financial records of the governor's public-private entity JobsOhio continues, as the deadline to meet a subpoena looms ahead.

Republican Auditor David Yost says he fully anticipates that the governor’s office will comply with the March 19 subpoena because he says he hasn’t formally heard otherwise, though Republican Gov. John Kasich has told reporters he doesn’t feel the auditor has the authority to audit JobsOhio’s private dollars.

The continuing questions surrounding transparency at JobsOhio came up again in a routine meeting about money that goes to an agency that partners with the controversial job-creating entity.

The Development Services Agency’s requests to the Controlling Board included money for loans it administers for the public-private entity JobsOhio. State Rep. and Ohio Democratic Party head Chris Redfern grilled the Development Services Agency about whether its funds could be audited by the state auditor.

Ohio's nonprofit job-creation entity is reporting raising nearly $7 million in donations and contributed services and paying top salaries to some staff last year.

Documents obtained by the Associated Press and other media show half of the 26 salaries paid by the organization were $100,000 or more.

The documents show that JobsOhio's president and chief investment officer drew a $225,000 salary in 2012, far more than Gov. John Kasich's salary of about $149,000.

Ohio's high court has agreed to settle a key legal question regarding the new private economic development entity created by Republican Gov. John Kasich: Do opponents have grounds to sue?

So far, lower courts have rejected a legal challenge to JobsOhio brought by a liberal policy group and two Democratic state lawmakers.

They've stopped short of ruling on the constitutionality of the nonprofit jobs-creation board, instead saying the parties can't show harm and so don't have standing to sue.

Ohio's new private job-creation entity is moving forward with a nearly $1.2 billion bond sale intended to fund its 25-year lease of the state's liquor business.

JobsOhio and Republican Gov. John Kasich's  administration made the joint announcement Tuesday. Proceeds of the Jan. 23 sale would go to economic development efforts.

JobsOhio Chief Investment Officer John Minor and Kasich's budget and commerce directors said they're confident in proceeding after Moody's and Standard and Poor's both issued favorable ratings Monday.

Ohio's new private job creation entity is asking the Ohio Supreme Court to force the state to provide funding that's been expected but delayed by a lawsuit.

The budget and commerce departments agreed to transfer rights to the state liquor business to JobsOhio for the next 25 years in a deal worth $1.4 billion.

JobsOhio filed a complaint Friday asking the high court to compel the commerce director to move forward with the agreement.

A coalition of progressive groups and a pair of Democratic state representatives are going back to the Ohio Supreme Court over the state’s job creation agency JobsOhio. But as Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports, this time they have some unlikely help.

Gov. John Kasich will take part in a Cincinnati meeting of the board of the state's new private job-creation partnership.

The session this afternoon will be at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center.

The governor last week announced an agreement between the state budget and commerce departments to transfer Ohio's liquor business to JobsOhio for the next 25 years. The deal is worth $1.4 billion.

The state Commerce Department is to continue to distribute and sell liquor in Ohio.

A state legislative panel has signed off contracts related to empowering the state's new private job-creation partnership, JobsOhio.

Last week, Gov. John Kasich announced an agreement between the state budget and commerce departments to transfer the state liquor business to JobsOhio for the next 25 years. The deal is worth $1.4 billion.

As part of the plan, the state Controlling Board on Monday approved a contract to allow the state Commerce Department to continue to distribute and sell liquor in Ohio.

The left-leaning group Progress Ohio says 24 million dollars in public money will go from the high-tech job creating Third Frontier program to local chambers of commerce. Brian Rothenberg says many of them support Ohio’s collective bargaining reform law.

“This is now a laundering scheme that allows for public money to flow into organizations that will be compromised in their decision-making over issues like Senate Bill 5 in the future,” says Rothenberg.

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