Jobs

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

This year marks the 50-year anniversary of the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which outlawed race and sex discrimination in employment and public facilities.

And a lot of people are asking: what has changed?

“Dayton has changed tremendously as far as where we were,” says Jessie O. Gooding of Jefferson Township. “We haven’t achieved the total goal.”

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

A citizens’ group has gathered 1,700 signatures on a petition asking the Target store in Trotwood not to close. Target recently announced that its Trotwood and Middletown stores in the Dayton area are set to shut down May 3.

Trotwood city council member Bruce Kettelle compared the news from Target to a break-up.

GM's Moraine assembly was once an iconic Dayton-area employer. A Chinese auto-glass company will soon take over the building, but the city of Moraine is still short thousands of jobs.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Last week’s big news that a Chinese company will take over a large part of the old GM plant in Moraine is still reverberating throughout the Miami Valley. Officials say the automotive glass manufacturer, Fuyao, is expected to bring at least 800 jobs by 2017.

It’s the biggest job-creation win so far for Governor John Kasich’s semi-private economic development arm, JobsOhio.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Both Ohio senators voted Tuesday to move ahead with debate on a 3-month, $6.4 billion extension of emergency unemployment insurance. Around 40,000 Ohio residents saw their insurance cut off at the end of December after congressional Republicans left the program out of a last-minute budget deal, and another 128,000 stand to get cut off sometime in 2014.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The U.S. Congress is on its way to a budget deal a couple weeks ahead of the January 1, 2014 deadline, but the deal doesn’t include extending emergency unemployment benefits. That means around 40,000 Ohioans could see their payments end this month.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Protests demanding a raise in the minimum wage have been spreading across the country, and the movement made its way to Dayton for the first time. On Thursday, union-backed groups reported events in over 100 cities; some involved worker walk-outs, but many were protests or demonstrations in front of fast food and retail outlets.

Outside the McDonald’s in downtown Dayton around lunchtime, a small crowd gathered near the road, rallying drivers to honk in support. The protesters’ complaint: Ohio’s minimum wage of $7.85 isn’t enough to actually live on.

Twin Towers in Dayton. St. Mary's Church, in the background, is central to the neighborhood's history. east side east end
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The Twin Towers neighborhood in Dayton was established more than a hundred years ago, and it’s been through a lot. Recently 84 new houses opened in the area for low-income families through a public-private partnership organized by East End Community Services. But what does this mean for a neighborhood trying to turn itself around?

 

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The State of Ohio and insurance industry advocates have launched an effort to urge veterans, students, and people changing careers to seek out insurance jobs. As baby-boomer employees begin to retire in droves, Ohio insurance companies expect to have 17,000 job openings in the next five years in all areas from claims to government relations.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

    

Blame it on the government shutdown: we missed a month of job reports this fall. But during that time, frankly not much happened. Unemployment in the greater Dayton area ticked up from 7.3 percent in August to 7.5 percent in October, with the number of jobs hovering around the October total of 369,600.

Petersirka / Openclipart

The holiday shopping forecast for the state of Ohio is better than last year’s, according to a study by the University of Cincinnati Economics Center, but the Dayton-area forecast is the worst in the state.

This holiday season Ohio retailers are looking at a 3.5 percent increase in sales compared to 2012. That estimate, produced by the Economics Center for the Ohio retail group “Focus On Ohio’s Future,” lags behind the national forecast of 3.9 percent. And it lags behind the same estimate last year, when Ohio retailers predicted a 4.2 percent increase from 2011.

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