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Issue 2

May 2 Primary Election Results Summary

May 3, 2017
Both Democrats and Republicans have launched major voter turnout efforts in advance of the November 2014 election.  vote election voters
elycefeliz / Flickr/Creative Commons

Unofficial results of last night’s primary election are in. The news is mixed for several Miami Valley school districts.

 Voters rejected school construction bond issues for Xenia and Valley View Schools. Voters also rejected a similar bond issue that was set to pay for renovations at the Miami Valley Career Technology Center.

School-renewal levies passed in Oakwood, Tipp City, Lebanon, and Yellow Springs. Voters in Beavercreek rejected a 6-mill school levy.

Dan Gummel

At a Tuesday night meeting, the Springfield City Commission voted unanimously to put Issue 2, an income tax increase, back on the ballot this May.

 

The levy originally failed during the November election. Since then, the city has cut police services and closed a local fire station. Mayor Warren Copeland says the commission was forced to make cuts due to decreased state funds.  

 

Officials with the no on 3/yes on 2 campaign celebrate a victory. Secretary of State Jon Husted is seated in the middle.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

 Ohio voters have approved a measure to prevent monopolies from being inserted into the state constitution.

The measure known as Issue 2 on Tuesday's ballot aims to keep individuals or private economic interests from placing new monopolies, cartels or oligopolies into the Ohio Constitution for their own benefit.

The practice has become increasingly common around the country as it becomes more expensive to mount a ballot campaign. Investors design such efforts to deliver economic benefits as a sort of return on investment for funding the ballot initiative.

Passage Of Issue 2 Could Lead To Legal Battles

Oct 27, 2015
Brian Bull / WCPN

Election Day is one week away. One of the measures on the ballot, Issue 2 – also known as the “anti-monopoly” amendment will get an up or down vote. Though some experts say if the statewide measure passes, it might be only the beginning of a long legal battle.

User: Coaster420 / Wikimedia/Creative Commons

People who want medical marijuana in Ohio say they are ready to vote for Issue 3, even if they don’t particularly like all of the aspects of the plan.

Issue 2 may have failed last night, but one of its backers says the issue behind it isn’t settled. Issue 2 would have taken the authority to draw district maps for state and federal lawmakers out of the hands of elected officials, and it lost by a 2-1 margin, according to unofficial results. But Ohio Democratic Party chair Chris Redfern says he thinks another move to change the map-drawing method will happen soon.

Both the statewide issues failed. Issue 1 would have convened a constitutional convention, and state lawmakers were hoping it wouldn’t pass so they could continue with an appointed commission which will make recommendations on changes to the constitution. And Issue 2 would have taken the power to draw the maps for state and federal lawmakers out of legislators’ hands and put it with a 12-member citizens’ panel.

Ohio voters have rejected a proposal to change the process for redrawing state legislative and congressional maps.

Issue 2 lost after a fight that pitted voter advocacy groups and unions against business interests and the Ohio Republican Party. Lawyers' groups split on the issue.

The constitutional amendment would have created a 12-member citizen commission to redraw Ohio's political districts every decade. It was prompted by discontent over the maps approved by the state Legislature in 2011.

With all the ads, calls and fliers for the Presidential and US Senate races in Ohio, there’s little room for the two statewide issues that are also before voters. And Issue 2 has strong coalitions of supporters and opponents working for and against it. Ohio Public Radio's Karen Kasler moderated a debate over Issue 2 before the Columbus Metropolitan Club.

PoliticsOhio: Productive Year For GOP In 2011

Dec 30, 2011

Emily McCord speaks to Bill Cohen from the Ohio Public Radio Statehouse News Bureau. Cohen wraps-up the year in politics, calling the GOP governor and legislature one of the most productive in years. He highlights the big political stories of 2011 and what it may mean for the year ahead.

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