How do you feel about your privacy? Do you take it for granted? Garret Keizer has spent some time pondering privacy issues. He shares some his ruminations in this new pocket-sized paperback.

Our privacy is being eroded. There are many reasons and excuses for why this is happening; the internet is one privacy invader. The events of 9/11 and the subsequent War on Terror provided the justification for privacy invasions on a global scale. That cell phone you carry can track your movements. That computer chip in your car can be used for surveillance. It never ends.

Claire Vaye Watkins just published her first book. "Battleborn" is a story collection that sizzles like the weather in the Death Valley region where Claire grew up.

She earned her MFA at OSU and began writing these stories while she was living in Ohio. Most of them are set in the West in places like Reno and Las Vegas. These stories are absolute page turners. They will haunt you and leave you wanting more.

In this interview I asked "is this fiction? What is this?"

Tom Kershaw

When embarking on her new album, The Science of Making Choices, Mieka Pauley turned to fan-funding to support the project and says that having her fans follow the progress of the album helped motivate her throughout the process.  Pauley spoke with Kaleidoscope host Juliet Fromholt about her writing process, finding ways to preserve her live sound during the recording process and why she enjoys being on the road.

Mieka Pauley will perform at Ghostlight Coffee in Dayton on September 12 at 8pm.

Verlyn Klinkenborg is one of my favorite writers. He just published a wonderful book about writing.

In "Several Short Sentences about Writing" Klinkenborg gets down to the basics; our sentences. How do we write them?

When we were children we knew how to tell stories. Then we went to school. That is where we supposedly learned how to write. Klinkenborg suggests that the ways we were taught to write are wrong.

So forget all your notions about writing. Listen to this interview. Then you'll probably want to read the book.


Norah Vincent's first novel is dark, dark, dark. Nick Walsh is in his mid-30's and he's depressed. He's writing down his thoughts. There are so many things that are troubling him. He carries around all this anger. So he drinks a lot. And he tries to kill the psychic pain that enfolds him.

But it is never that easy to bury your feelings. As Nick comes to grips with the reality of his past and of his current situation we begin to feel a slight bit of compassion and sympathy for him.

Alafair Burke's latest novel "Never Tell" opens as the police are investigating the suicide of a young woman. Her body was found in the luxurious Manhattan apartment where she lived. Her parents lived elsewhere while she stayed in the city to attend an exclusive prep school. This seems to be a somewhat peculiar arrangement.

The first time I interviewed James Lee Burke he came out to WYSO during his book tour for "Cimarron Rose." That was back in 1998. Burke stopped touring a number of years ago. Fortunately for his fans he still does the occasional interview and he is as prolific as ever.

James Lee Burke has been my guest in the Book Nook more often than any other author. I caught up with him recently to talk about  his new Dave Robicheaux novel "Creole Belle." I called him on the telephone at his place in Montana.

Tana French just published her fourth novel in a mystery series that features the Dublin Murder Squad. The book immediately entered the New York Times top ten list for fiction. I taped a phone interview with French while she was in New York recently on  book tour. Here's my mini-review of the book that ran in the Dayton Daily News and the Springfield News-Sun:

Last year I reviewed Donald Ray Pollock's debut novel for the Washington Independent Review of Books. Here's an excerpt from what I wrote:

As we mark the 150th anniversary of the Civil War many new books are being published about it.  In "A World On Fire - Britain's Crucial Role in the American Civil War," Amanda Foreman gives readers a rather different perspective on this monumental conflict. Foreman examines the war through the eyes of the British.