Photo by Elizabeth Fladung

LaVette is renowned for her eclectic musical style, combining elements of rock, funk, R&B, country, gospel, soul, and blues.

In her interview, LaVette reminisces over her early beginnings in 1965 and her experiences with famous artists such as Otis Redding and James Brown humorously admitting, "Well, he wasn't that big then."

After listening to the original recording of her chart single "Let Me Down Easy" on Excursions, she states, "I almost cried."

Langhorne Slim, named for his hometown in Pennsylvania, has been steadily gaining public notice, being featured on the film The Waitress' soundtrack, playing at various folk festivals across North America, and just having returned from Bonnaroo Music Festival.

David Lee Garrison joins Conrad Balliet in the WYSO studios to talk about their common background in traditional verse.  They talk about different styles of poetry and how writing in rhyme can be liberating.  Garrison shares examples of several types of poems and talks about what inspired each.

Trevor Hall's self-titled album is his first release on Vanguard Records.  Hall and his band visited the WYSO studios on the road from Iowa to Columbus and performed several live songs.  Hall chats with Niki Dakota about community in songwriting and getting to meet and tour with Matisyahu.  Trevor Hall be opening for Michael Franti and Spearhead at the Newport Music Hall in Columbus tonight. 

2007 Fabrizio Ferri

Some might say trumpeter Chris Botti has a natural talent for performing and composing contemporary jazz music. According to Botti, however, he wasn’t born with it.

“Talent is really 99% drive and focus, and 1% luck,” said Botti in this Excursions interview.

Susan Frikken


Who makes a perfect “road trip record?” According to Niki Dakota, it’s Peter Mulvey.

Singer-songwriter Peter Mulvey has been recording and touring as a solo artist since the early 1990’s. Originally from Wisconsin, Mulvey’s music has taken him everywhere from Dublin, Ireland to the streets of Boston, where he performed early on in his career. Over the last 15 years, he has steadily developed a following through critically acclaimed folk records like 2006’s “The Knuckleball Suite.”


Jokes abound in this laughter-filled 2009 Excursions interview with multi-talented country and jazz musician Dan Hicks.

Hicks has been playing music for over 50 years. Beginning as a drummer as a young child, Hicks joined folk-rock group the Charlatans in 1965. Hicks struck out on his own in the late ‘60s, putting together backing band the Hot Licks for a string of records, including 1973’s classic “Last Train to Hicksville.” The band broke up in the mid-70’s, but has since reformed, releasing several records and touring internationally for the last decade.