Immigration

U.S. Senator Rob Portman will meet with farmers in the Dayton area today to answer questions about the farm bill.

For most farmers, the first concern about the farm bill is making sure there is a farm bill. The bill expires every five years, and the U.S. House and Senate have until October to agree on a new version or extend the old one.

Ohio's higher education chief says illegal immigrants with temporary legal status will soon be able to pay in-state tuition rates at the state's public colleges as long as they meet other residency requirements.

Most of the state's two- and four-year public colleges have previously charged students who are illegal immigrants tuition rates much higher than what other Ohio students pay.

The Columbus Dispatch reports that John Carey, chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents, sent a letter Wednesday to the state's college presidents notifying them of the changes.

Businesses would have to prioritize hiring an American worker over a foreign one, under a bipartisan amendment announced Tuesday by U-S Senator Sherrod Brown of Ohio.

Senator Brown says the amendment essentially restores language in the Senate’s immigration bill that requires companies offering positions to recruit AND hire qualified American workers ahead of foreign workers seeking H-1B visas.  The H-1B allows foreign workers with advanced degrees and specialized skills to work in the U.S., on a temporary three-year basis.  Last year, 135-thousand were issued in the country.

In the final installment of WYSO’s ReInvention Stories, we meet Francisco and Maribel Arias Hernandez. The couple came to the United States from Mexico in 1989.  They planned to earn money and go back but they ended up starting a family in Chicago, and they lived there for 15 years. Francisco and Maribel came to Dayton with their two sons to start a construction business - during a time when authorities were cracking down on undocumented workers, and immigrants in Southwest Ohio were living in fear.

Ohio is reportedly one of 15 states where undocumented immigrants are being sent back to their home country after seeking medical care. Controversy and concerns regarding immigrants are sparking discussion about immigration reform all across the political spectrum.

Dayton mayor Gary Leitzell has returned from a trip to Turkey with other area mayors, university officials, business leaders and other community members. As Emily McCord reports for WYSO Dayton is uniquely positioned to bring their business here.

The Supreme Court ruled struck down many of the components of Arizona's immigration bill week, but left the part that requires police officers to check the immigration status of anyone they suspect may be in the country illegally. An Ohio legislator wants to have a similar law in Ohio. Emily McCord speaks to Tony Ortiz for this week's edition of PoliticsOhio. He's with Wright State University and says that this is an issue that the Hispanic community in the Miami Valley is ver

Last week, President Obama issued an executive order that gives young people who were brought into the country as young children and have lived here all of their lives some protection against deportation. Now a couple of Ohio Senators want to take that a step further in Ohio. Democratic State Senator Charleta Tavares explains her legislation to make college more affordable for children of undocumented immigrants.

Officials have given unanimous approval to Dayton's "immigrant-friendly" plan aimed at bolstering a shrinking population.

Dayton Mayor Gary Leitzell read a statement during Wednesday's city commission meeting saying the Welcome Dayton program is not about harboring illegal immigrants or drawing them into the city. He says the focus instead is on treating all people kindly, fairly and humanely.

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