WYSO

Immigration

downtown dayton
Juliet Fromholt

The city of Dayton has been officially designated a Welcoming City, a status officials hope will spur economic development.

 

The certification recognizes Dayton’s efforts to integrate immigrants into the community. The city was audited by Welcoming America, a nonpartisan organization that evaluates programs and resources available to immigrants.

Some university officials are speaking out in the wake of the Trump administration's announcement it will end the DACA program for young people brought to the United States illegally as children
Joshua Chenault / WYSO

Some Dayton university leaders are reacting to the Trump administration’s recently announced plan to phase out the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, immigration program without swift action from Congress.

DACA allows young people brought to the country illegally as children to temporarily work and study in the United States under certain eligibility conditions.  

 

DACA currently permits nearly 800,000 people to temporarily work and study in the United States. Most are under age 19. Department of Homeland Security statistics show 9,600 DACA recipients live in Ohio
Jess Mador / WYSO

About 100 people rallied in Dayton Tuesday in support of a program allowing young people brought to the country illegally as children to remain in the United States.

The protest was hastily organized after the Trump administration’s announcement it would phase out the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, also known as DACA. 

President Donald Trump is calling for Congress to come up with a replacement for the Obama-era DACA program within six months. 

Demonstrators at a 2010 protest in Washington D.C. demanding immigration reform. Several efforts since have failed in Congress.
Nevele Otseog / Flickr/Creative Commons

Miami Valley immigrant advocates are calling on the Trump administration to continue a program that allows young people brought to the United States illegally as children to remain in the country.

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, permits about 800,000 people to temporarily work, attend school or serve in the military under certain conditions.

President Donald Trump is expected to issue a decision soon on whether to continue with the Obama-era program.

Flickr Creative Commons User Canadian Pacific

The Columbus City Council has voted in favor of an executive order by Mayor Andrew Ginther creating protections for the city's immigrants.

The vote Monday makes it against the law in Columbus to arrest or deny someone services based on their immigration status.

While the law reflects other sanctuary city laws across the country, officials say Columbus is not a "sanctuary city." President Donald Trump has threatened to withdraw federal funding from cities that act as sanctuaries for immigrants.

President Trump signed an executive order this week calling for a report on changes needed to reform visa programs for international workers. Advocates say this could lead to a reduction in foreign labor in the United States. This possibility has some local employers worried about the future of their businesses.

Immigration lawyer Catherine McCarthy says she’s been fielding calls from business owners who rely on foreign workers for the busy summer season.

Maribel Trujillo Diaz, the Butler County mother of four who'd been battling an imminent deportation order, has been sent back to her native Mexico.

The Sixth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has cleared the way for a Butler County woman to be deported to Mexico.

A Butler County woman scheduled for deportation remains in the U.S. as of Tuesday afternoon.

View of Cincinnati from the mouth of the Licking River. Economist Richard Stock says more and more people are taking the trip down I-75 for work.
Robert S. Donovan / Flickr/Creative Commons

The U.S. attorney general's latest warning that so-called sanctuary cities could lose federal funding has raised more questions about whether Cincinnati might be in jeopardy of losing grants after adopting that legally ambiguous label.

Some sanctuary cities block cooperation between city police and federal immigration authorities.

Pages