WYSO

Immigration

View of Cincinnati from the mouth of the Licking River. Economist Richard Stock says more and more people are taking the trip down I-75 for work.
Robert S. Donovan / Flickr/Creative Commons

The city council has declared Cincinnati as a "sanctuary city," a label that isn't legally defined but typically indicates reduced cooperation with federal immigration authorities on some matters involving people who are in the U.S. illegally.

It's mostly symbolic. Mayor John Cranley has said Cincinnati has long welcomed immigrants and will continue to support them, but won't break federal law.

Supporters and opponents of the move packed the council meeting.

Wright State University
K. Shimada/Wikimedia Commons

It was a hectic weekend for international education coordinators at Dayton-area universities. Since President Donald Trump’s executive order temporarily barring citizens from seven predominantly Muslim countries from entering the U.S., some are scrambling to figure out the next steps for their affected students.

Michelle Streeter-Ferrari, the director of the Center for International Education at Wright State University, says there’s been a lot of confusion surrounding the executive order.

With just one week under his belt as president, Donald Trump has issued several executive orders regarding immigration - one designed to kick-start the building of a wall between the U.S. / Mexican border. The other would limit immigration from countries with known terrorist ties. In this week's Politics Ohio, WYSO's Jerry Kenney speaks with Glen Duerr, assistant professor of international studies at Cedarville University to discuss local impact.

Portman, Strickland Offer Differing Options on Immigration

Oct 31, 2016
U.S. Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio); former Gov. Ted Strickland (D-Ohio)
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

Two longtime Ohio politicians are duking it out for your vote in the race for U.S. Senate. Republican Senator Rob Portman has held the office since 2011 but Democratic former Gov. Ted Strickland wants to take his place.

downtown dayton
Juliet Fromholt

A new report from the Partnership for a New American Economy says immigrant-owned businesses had a $532 million dollar economic impact in Ohio in 2014.

 

According to the report, about 481,000 Ohio residents were born outside the county. Around 20 percent are self-employed, and more than 122,000 Ohio residents are employed at immigrant owned businesses.

 

Antioch College

The mass movement of people across national boundaries has become one of the defining characteristics of our era. In the Americas, Europe, the Middle East and North Africa, millions of people—welcomed and unwelcomed—are fleeing the effects of war, poverty, crime, intergroup conflict, and environmental change. At the same time, political discourse in the US has sunk to new depths with national political leaders calling for the construction of walls and moratoria on the acceptance of refugees.

“Syria In Our Eyes” Brings Syrian Youth Perspective To Dayton

Mar 25, 2016

A 2014 UNICEF report calls Syria one of the most dangerous places in the world to be a child. Since the start of the war in Syria in 2011, thousands of children have lost their families and friends and witnessed violence and brutality. One Syrian American family in the Dayton area has responded to the violence by organizing an exhibit of art by Syrian children. Syria in Our Eyes is on display at K12 and TEJAS Gallery in Dayton.

Demonstrators at a 2010 protest in Washington D.C. demanding immigration reform. Several efforts since have failed in Congress.
Nevele Otseog / Flickr/Creative Commons

A representative of the White House addressed advocates in Dayton Thursday about their efforts to make immigrants welcome, but immigration reform was the elephant in the room.

Dayton's officials are coming up against some unknowns in the budget process for next year.
Derek Jensen

Representatives from more than a dozen rust belt cities are gathering in Dayton Thursday to talk about immigration and economic development. The “Welcoming Economies” conference will include a keynote speech by Felicia Escobar, Special Assistant to the President for Immigration Policy.

This week, a free screening of the new documentary film, Vanishing Borders will take place at the Madden Hills Library in Dayton. The film gives viewers a look into the lives of four immigrant women living in New York City and transforming their communities. Then after the film, director and producer, Alexandra Hidalgo, will discuss the documentary with author Katrina Kittle and member of the audience. Kittle is a former teacher and mentor of Hidalgo's.

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