Immigration

Obama
BLOOMBERG

Tonight President Obama will announce executive actions he will take on immigration. He is expected to offer deportation protection and work visas for millions of people in the country illegally, but it is unclear just how many people would be covered by the action.

Whatever that number is, tomorrow many of them will be asking “Ok, so what do I do now?”

City of Dayton / The Olhmann Group

Soccer fever swept around the globe in June during the World Cup playoffs. At the time, many local businesses saw a positive economic impact as fans gathered in restaurants and bars to watch the tournament.

On Friday and Saturday, world soccer is back—at least in the Miami Valley—as players from Dayton’s immigrant communities take to the field.

City of Dayton Youth Services Director Joe Parlette says the games were born out of the Welcome Dayton initiative.

A controversy could be fizzling out over whether Dayton will host immigrant children from Central America in temporary shelters. The federal government told Mayor Nan Whaley it might not need the help, after all.

mayor nan whaley
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

A feud is unfolding over whether Dayton should take in immigrant children from Central America who have been crossing the border by the tens of thousands in recent months.

Democratic Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley is facing off against Congressman Mike Turner and a group of local politicians, who penned a letter Sunday to President Barack Obama voicing their disagreement with Whaley’s stance.

UNHCR

The United Nations established World Refugee Day to honor people forced to flee their homes under threat of persecution, conflict and violence. 

In 2013, there were an estimated 10.4 million refugees around the world.  In 2014, with situations in Syria, Somalia, Iraq and other places, those numbers are likely to grow drastically.

Immigration reform might be dead in Washington for now, but some local advocates are still on the case. One of those is long-time conservative activist and teacher Carl Ruby. He’s part of a new initiative called Welcome Springfield—a takeoff on Welcome Dayton—to work on making Springfield a more appealing place for immigrants.

Disagreements with neighbors or spouses can be ugly, and they can also be costly for the people and institutions involved. The Dayton Mediation Center has been working for 27 years to stem the social and fiscal costs of conflict by addressing it at its root, using volunteer mediators. The center works closely with neighborhood groups and the Montgomery County juvenile court to take on cases that might otherwise go through police, or result in either criminal charges or expensive litigation.

Openclipart

 Conservative leaders from Ohio are headed to Washington this week to lobby for immigration reform in a collaboration between businesses, evangelicals, and law enforcement. Twenty Ohio leaders are among the hundreds who have meetings set with House Republicans Tuesday. While the Senate passed a comprehensive bill earlier this year, the House has yet to bring a bill to the floor.

U.S. Senator Rob Portman will meet with farmers in the Dayton area today to answer questions about the farm bill.

For most farmers, the first concern about the farm bill is making sure there is a farm bill. The bill expires every five years, and the U.S. House and Senate have until October to agree on a new version or extend the old one.

Ohio's higher education chief says illegal immigrants with temporary legal status will soon be able to pay in-state tuition rates at the state's public colleges as long as they meet other residency requirements.

Most of the state's two- and four-year public colleges have previously charged students who are illegal immigrants tuition rates much higher than what other Ohio students pay.

The Columbus Dispatch reports that John Carey, chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents, sent a letter Wednesday to the state's college presidents notifying them of the changes.

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