WYSO

Immigration

President Trump signed an executive order this week calling for a report on changes needed to reform visa programs for international workers. Advocates say this could lead to a reduction in foreign labor in the United States. This possibility has some local employers worried about the future of their businesses.

Immigration lawyer Catherine McCarthy says she’s been fielding calls from business owners who rely on foreign workers for the busy summer season.

Maribel Trujillo Diaz, the Butler County mother of four who'd been battling an imminent deportation order, has been sent back to her native Mexico.

The Sixth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has cleared the way for a Butler County woman to be deported to Mexico.

A Butler County woman scheduled for deportation remains in the U.S. as of Tuesday afternoon.

View of Cincinnati from the mouth of the Licking River. Economist Richard Stock says more and more people are taking the trip down I-75 for work.
Robert S. Donovan / Flickr/Creative Commons

The U.S. attorney general's latest warning that so-called sanctuary cities could lose federal funding has raised more questions about whether Cincinnati might be in jeopardy of losing grants after adopting that legally ambiguous label.

Some sanctuary cities block cooperation between city police and federal immigration authorities.

Ohio House Democrats Respond To Trump Administration Threat On Sanctuary Cities

Mar 28, 2017
Statehouse News Bureau

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions issued an ultimatum to so-called sanctuary cities and states: either work with federal immigration enforcement or lose grant funding. But House Democrats aren’t budging.

Several cities have said they will not dedicate local law enforcement resources to carry out immigration laws for federal agencies, that includes Columbus and Cincinnati.

Wikimedia Commons User Namtrofk

Universities across the Miami Valley could feel the impact of President Donald Trump’s revised executive order on immigration and refugees. The president’s new order signed Monday temporarily suspends the processing of visa applications from Iran, Somalia, Yemen, Sudan, Syria, and Libya for 90 days. Iraqi citizens are not affected by the revised order. The ban also does not apply to people who already hold valid visas.

Sergio Gomez's work "The Bleeding Border" was the piece used to promote Latino Art of the Midwest at the University of Dayton. Gomez is based in Chicago.
Jonathan Platt / WYSO

News this week of sweeping Trump administration changes to United States immigration-enforcement policies is sparking a wave of fear among both legal immigrants and immigrants in the Miami Valley illegally, advocates say. The immigration crackdown means millions of people living in the country illegally could face deportation.

View of Cincinnati from the mouth of the Licking River. Economist Richard Stock says more and more people are taking the trip down I-75 for work.
Robert S. Donovan / Flickr/Creative Commons

The city council has declared Cincinnati as a "sanctuary city," a label that isn't legally defined but typically indicates reduced cooperation with federal immigration authorities on some matters involving people who are in the U.S. illegally.

It's mostly symbolic. Mayor John Cranley has said Cincinnati has long welcomed immigrants and will continue to support them, but won't break federal law.

Supporters and opponents of the move packed the council meeting.

Wright State University
K. Shimada/Wikimedia Commons

It was a hectic weekend for international education coordinators at Dayton-area universities. Since President Donald Trump’s executive order temporarily barring citizens from seven predominantly Muslim countries from entering the U.S., some are scrambling to figure out the next steps for their affected students.

Michelle Streeter-Ferrari, the director of the Center for International Education at Wright State University, says there’s been a lot of confusion surrounding the executive order.

Pages