History

4th and Goal? The Past of the American University and the Future of the NCAA

Sep 30, 2014
Ohio State University Archives

History Talk continues its exploration of the relationship between American university sports and the National Collegiate Athletic Association, or NCAA.

Taylor Branch on the Crisis of College Sports

Sep 24, 2014
Ohio State University Archives

How we debate college sports connects to a long history, dating all the way back to the Greeks and Romans.

Clark County will take a step back in time this weekend with the 31st annual Fair at New Boston. Katie Wright is co-fair master this year. She feels the event paints a picture of what life was like 200 years ago when Ohio was transitioning from a territory to a state.

"The Fair at New Boston is a highly respected living history reenactment that focuses on a federal time period, 1790 -1810. And it's a civilian trades fair, which is sort of a rare thing in living history events because most are focused around a battle or some major history event and ours is not," Wright said.

In the summer of 1908, Wilbur Wright astonished the world, demonstrating the Wright Flyer in France.  No one had ever flown as long and with such control.  The world took notice.

Back here in the states, that same summer, Orville Wright was making demonstration flights, too, for the US Army's Signal Corps, trying to get a contract to sell planes to the US government.  Dayton aviation historian and photographer Dan Patterson tells the story.

The controversies generated by climate science in recent years center around the human relationship with the natural world and with natural resources. This month, historian John Brooke puts that critical question in historical perspective—deep historical perspective. For most of human history, our species had to struggle to survive powerful natural forces, like climate and disease. In the past three centuries, however, things have changed dramatically: that struggle has been reshaped by the unprecedented growth of the human population—from under one billion to now over seven.

As the American combat mission in Iraq comes to end, the Obama administration and Pentagon officials have repeatedly assured the world that American involvement with Iraq will continue. They are undoubtedly right. Since the founding of Iraq in the aftermath of World War I, U.S. policy has included cooperation, confrontation, war, and, most recently, an ongoing experiment in state-building. This month, Peter Hahn, an expert on the history of U.S.

With the ongoing East African drought crisis, the persisting threat of global climate change, and the world population now estimated at 7 billion, global concerns about food insecurity are again in the news. Little mentioned, however, is the continuing loss of genetic diversity of the foods we eat today—a trend that has rapidly accelerated since the twentieth century and that raises troubling questions about the vulnerability of the world’s food supply.

Dangerous Women

Oct 21, 2010
Library of Congress

To commemorate the anniversary of the 19th amendment to the constitution, WYSO 91.3 FM and the Living History Theatre presents an original radio drama, "Dangerous Women." This original work by Yellow Springs playwright Kay Reimers, concerns the beginning and end of the nearly century long struggle to give women the right to vote.

Library of Congress

One quiet autumn morning the United States was suddenly attacked by a small band of determined men inspired by a charismatic religious fanatic. The emotional response by the entire country to an unprovoked raid, which caused the deaths of innocent civilians, lead the United States to war. The year was 1859, the place was Harpers Ferry, Virginia, and the leader was John Brown.

Library of Congress

One hundred years ago this week, the citizens of Dayton, Ohio and surrounding communities watched in disbelief as collapsing levees allowed flood waters to overtake the city in a matter of moments.    

WYSO and the Living History Theatre present an original radio drama, "The End of Emerald Street."  Set during the Great Dayton Flood, the story combines fictional characters with historical figures like John H. Patterson, Arthur Morgan, and John Barringer.