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The 'Movie Memphis Belle' appearing this week at Grimes Field airbase in Urbana, Ohio.
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

An assortment of WWII-era planes took to the skies above Dayton Wednesday, as the National Museum of the United States Air Force unveiled its latest exhibit. The show includes the restored B-17 bomber called The Memphis Belle. The infamous plane was the first to complete 25 missions over Europe during the Second World War. The plane and its missions were the subject of a documentary, and a feature film.

The renovated B-17 used in the 1990 film the movie, also called Memphis Belle, was part of the early morning flyover above the museum.

Paul Laurence Dunbar
Courtesy of the Ohio History Connection

More than a hundred years ago, there were two young men at Central High School in downtown Dayton who became lifelong friends. Their lives were both tragically short, but full of consequence. One became Dayton’s first licensed African American doctor—the other the world’s first internationally acclaimed African American poet. Community Voices Producer Leo DeLuca has a story about Dr. William A. Burns, known as “Bud,” and his friend,  Paul Laurence Dunbar.

The number of African American-owned businesses has fallen sharply in Yellow Springs from its peak four decades ago. Only a handful remain in the village.
Jess Mador / WYSO

The number of African American-owned businesses has fallen sharply in Yellow Springs from its peak four decades ago. Only a handful remain in the village.

Antioch College History Professor Kevin McGruder credits some of the shift to rising college-graduation rates among many blacks in Yellow Springs.

"So, as black people have had access to more college they seek more opportunities and jobs they can get with those degrees than in opening up a store," McGruder says.

This spring 2018, the Quaker Heritage Center is facilitating a series of talks and musical performances that highlight the power of solidarity and resistance among African-Americans, Abolitionists, and Quakers. At the same time, these programs will addres
Photo provided by Wilmington College

Education is obviously the main focus of any educational institution's mission, and Wilmington College's upcoming speaker series will not only educate but tie historical perspectives to current events.

 

To find out more about the series, we spoke with Tanya Maus, director of the Peace Resource Center and Quaker Heritage Center at Wilmington, and Ursula McTaggart, an associate professor of English there.

 

Longtown's restoration is underway.
Jerry Kenney

In southwest Ohio, about a mile from the Indiana state line, a long-forgotten town with a special place in African American history is struggling to be reborn.

Longtown was established nearly 200 years ago in what is now Greenville. The settlement grew into a thriving mixed-race community and a major stop on the Underground Railroad.

Now, descendants of those pioneering settlers are working to bring Longtown back to life for others to experience.

Longtown’s History

Native Sovereignty and the Dakota Access Pipeline

Feb 11, 2017

As the struggle between members of the Standing Rock Reservation and their allies against the Dakota Access Pipeline continues, History Talk takes a look at the long-term patterns of Native American relations with the U.S. government.

History Talk: North Korea - The Myth of a Hermit Kingdom

Dec 15, 2016

In this episode of History Talk, hosts Brenna Miller and Jessica Blissit speak with three experts on North Korea: Deborah Solomon, Mitchell Lerner, and Youngbae Hwang.

History Talk: America's Post-Election Political Landscape

Nov 18, 2016

In this episode of History Talk, hosts Jessica Blissit and Brenna Miller interview three experts on American politics—Kimberly Hamlin, Marc Horger, and Paula Baker—in the wake of the 2016 presidential election.

History Talk: Hooked - Drugs, Prohibition, and American Cities

Oct 17, 2016

Since the 1970s, the "War on Drugs" has absorbed billions of dollars, fueled armed interventions overseas, imprisoned millions of individuals, and stigmatized inner city communities--all without appearing to have produced a measurable impact on actual drug use.

On this episode of History Talk, host Patrick Potyondy interviews Jefferson Cowie, the James G. Stahlman Chair in the Department of History at Vanderbuilt University. Cowie has written extensively on American economic, racial, cultural, and political history, and is the author most recently of The Great Exception: The New Deal and the Limits of American Politics.

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