Higher Education

Co-op Stories From '15 and '16

Sep 4, 2013
Nargees Jumahan

 

Anyone who knows anything about Antioch knows about the cooperative education, or co-op, program. For Antioch students co-op is a chance to learn new things and experience a different way of life. We carry our co-op experiences with us forever and anyone who has talked with an alumn can tell you that the stories only get better with time. This month on the Word we hear three stories from current students about their latest co-ops.

Theme music for the Word was written, performed and produced by Seth Kaplan. Additional music for this episode is by Jason Shaw.   

The interim president of Ohio State University says he has work to do to push the OSU brand across the country internationally, but he says he doesn’t feel damage control is part of that. Joe Alutto is taking over for Gordon Gee, who retired earlier this summer after a controversy over a series of headline-making verbal gaffes. Alutto says he doesn’t think he has to repair any burned bridges as he moves into Gee’s office.

Ohio's higher education chief says illegal immigrants with temporary legal status will soon be able to pay in-state tuition rates at the state's public colleges as long as they meet other residency requirements.

Most of the state's two- and four-year public colleges have previously charged students who are illegal immigrants tuition rates much higher than what other Ohio students pay.

The Columbus Dispatch reports that John Carey, chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents, sent a letter Wednesday to the state's college presidents notifying them of the changes.

Miami University Makes Strides Toward Acceptance of Gay Students

Jun 25, 2013

Students and alumni say that Miami University has created a climate of acceptance for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer students, despite the school’s longstanding conservative reputation and location in a deeply conservative part of the state.

Senators Work To Forge A Compromise On College Loans

Jun 24, 2013

College and university officials, and many students and parents are watching closely to see whether Congress takes action this week on federally subsidized college loans. The interest rate on subsidized Stafford loans is set to double when the current rate of 3.4 percent sunsets on July 1st.

Miami University Student Veterans

May 24, 2013

Over the last year, journalism students at Miami University have been interviewing a misunderstood population at their school - student veterans.  As returning soldiers transition back into civilian life with few options in the ever-shrinking job market, going back to school has become a growing national trend across the country.  As the first class attending college on the 9/11 GI Bill graduates this month, student producers set out to capture the more personal and intimate human stories they felt were missing from   coverage on war and veterans’ issues.

Wittenberg University's Concerned Black Students group held its 45th annual Walkout event this week. The event commemorates a 1969 incident when 38 of the school's 45 black students walked off campus when they alleged the university failed to address their concerns about unequal treatment.

A former state lawmaker has been appointed as the next chancellor overseeing higher education in Ohio.

Gov. John Kasich on Wednesday announced the appointment of John Carey as chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents, effective April 29. The appointment to lead one of the largest higher education networks in the country is subject to the Ohio Senate's approval.

A new association is lobbying for better benefits and bargaining rights for part-time faculty at Ohio's public universities.

The Ohio Part-Time Faculty Association also wants to boost pay for these adjunct professors, who make up about two-thirds of the state's public university faculty.

The Akron Beacon Journal reports Thursday that Youngstown State University has the most part-time faculty, while the University of Akron has more than 1,000 part-time professors.

The University of Dayton is promising new freshmen that they will pay the same amount for tuition all four years they are in school.

The guarantee to new freshmen eliminates the uncertainty of how much a bachelor's degree will cost by removing hidden fees.

The university said students will receive a two-page financial aid prospectus detailing the costs, and also pledging that that their scholarships and grants will grow dollar-for-dollar each year as tuition increases.   

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