Higher Education

Wilberforce University was set to name a new president this week, but the selected candidate turned down the offer, and now a new search is underway.

Dwayne Smith, vice-president of academic affairs at Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis, Mo, was offered the job to become the school's 20th president at an alumni conference in Memphis. But the head of the Wilberforce Faculty Association, Richard Deering, indicated that Smith balked at the offer after learning he was not the university's first choice.

Democratic candidate for Lieutenant Governor Sharen Neuhardt is speaking at Sinclair Community College Thursday afternoon about Ed Fitzgerald’s platform on higher education. Neuhardt says if Fitzgerald is elected governor, he will establish a fund that helps Ohio students begin saving for college in kindergarten. Fitzgerald, currently the Cuyahoga County Executive, launched a program last month that starts a college savings account for every Cuyahoga County kindergartner.

Antioch College celebrated the news this weekend that the school is on the fast track to accreditation. The college was closed in 2008 by the board of trustees of Antioch University, and it reopened three years ago as a separate entity, driven (and funded) primarily by alumni who couldn’t stand to see the 162-year-old institution disappear.

Reaching Beyond the Ivory Tower

Apr 8, 2014

Given all the furor about the role of academics in public life—a debate taking place in The Atlantic, Politico, and The New York Times among other places—History Talk naturally wanted to dive headfirst into the topic.

Central State is one of two historically black universities in Greene County.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Central State University in Greene County has announced it’s getting a $1 million gift from an alum, entrepreneur and media figure Josh Smith. On the same day the gift was announced, at least 17 people were laid off from the school.

The university has been in negotiations with labor unions for a while about the need to make cuts, and Central State spokeswoman Gayle Barge says seventeen people got letters on Tuesday—secretaries, facilities workers and mail people, many of them members of the AFSCME union.  

A large statewide proposal for state of Ohio funds for colleges and universities was released in January that includes $50 million in requests from the Dayton area. The capital budget, as it’s called, is a biennial funding process to pay for long-term investments and infrastructure upgrades.

Miami University is seeking to be considered among the nation's elite schools wants to keep upgrading its recruiting classes.

But Miami University's quest to lure more top students to Oxford will need more funding. The Cincinnati Enquirer reports that Miami's latest freshman class came with an average ACT score of 27.5, a full point higher than last year. The goal is for a student average of 30 within six years.

School officials are looking for more private donations for scholarships and to attract more out-of-state students who pay higher tuition.

Miami University is working to preserve 19th century land grant documents recently recovered by the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma from a key moment in its history.

Tribe members say the grants marked the tribe's transition from collectively held land to individual ownership as it tried and mostly failed to avoid government relocation.

Miami University is preserving eight land grants found in storage at a Catholic diocese in Indiana. They include one signed in 1823 by President James Monroe and seven signed in 1843 by President John Tyler.

Adrien Facélina

A Dayton education initiative called Learn to Earn has been selected for a national partnership. The Lumina Foundation is giving 20 cities up to $200,000 for the project. It's part of an effort to prepare the region for the high paying jobs of the future.

SalFalko / Flickr Creative Commons

College applications deadlines are approaching, and Ohio students are facing the daunting question of how to fund their education. Financial aid is down in the state, and student debt is up.

The total budget for need-based aid in the state of Ohio peaked in 2008 at $183 million, while the 2013 budget is just $86 million. Budget cuts in 2009 are responsible for a lot of that change, and while federal Pell Grant funding has increased dramatically, that growth has been outpaced by increases in tuition and living costs.

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