Healthcare

Full episode of WYSO Weekend for March 3, 2012 including the following stories:

-Ohio Senator Portman Talks Sequestration at WPAFB, by Jerry Kenney

-Local Healthcare Providers Weigh Pros and Cons on Medicaid Expansion, by Jerry Kenney

Ohio is prepared to move forward with certain Medicaid contracts after an appellate court ruled in the state's favor in a lawsuit that had blocked officials from signing the agreements.

Amerigroup Corp. had sued the state, claiming the contract application process was flawed. The insurer was not among the top scorers.

The contract winners will provide health care services to 1.6 million Ohioans on Medicaid. The contracts provide billions in government work to the winning companies.

The Ohio House has passed a bill to require training and certification for a new group of professionals who will be available to guide consumers through the new health insurance exchange.

The measure cleared Wednesday on a 56-32 vote, and it now heads to the Senate.

These so-called health navigators will help educate consumers and small businesses about the new online markets created by the federal health care law. Through these exchanges, consumers will be able to buy individual private policies and apply for government subsidies to help pay their premiums.

A new national report says expanding Medicaid eligibility in Ohio under the Affordable Care Act would reduce the number of uninsured residents by half.

It would also cost the state an additional $3.1 billion in the next decade.

The Dayton Daily News says the numbers come from a report by the Kaiser Family Foundation, a Washington-based nonpartisan health care policy research organization.

Governor Kasich has told the federal government Ohio will not set up its own health insurance exchange and will instead leave that to the feds. That decision is being praised by Maurice Thompson with the conservative 1851 Center.

"We’re very happy with the administration’s decision not to enter a state based exchange because we were either going to have to file a lawsuit against the state if it entered one or against the federal government if they didn’t," says Thompson.

Advocates for the federal health care law are celebrating the start of the countdown toward October 1 of next year, when 1.5 million uninsured Ohioans can start shopping a health insurance marketplace called an exchange. But there’s still a lot of uncertainty about who will set up and run that exchange.

The Supreme Courts decision on President Obama's Affordable Care act has already received mixed reaction across the country, and as WYSO's Emily McCord reports, there's still argument on what this will mean for Ohio.

Full episode of WYSO Weekend for June 24, 2012 containing the following stories:

-Jerry Kenney speaks with Fran Tiburzio from the Ohio Humanities Council about Ohio Chautauqua coming to Urbana.

-WYSO Community Voices coordinator Sarah Buckingham join Jerry Kenney to talk about the WYSO Open House

-New Ohio Guide: Paths to Freedom – The Underground Railroad in Ohio, by Meg Hanrahan

Five of the six managed care organizations that lost bids for state Medicaid contracts have filed protests with Ohio officials.

This month, Ohio chose the contract winners that will provide health care services for more than 1.5 million poor and disabled people.

The Columbus Dispatch reports companies that lost out on the billions of dollars in work say the Department of Job and Family Services made errors in awarding the contracts. Several companies allege scoring on bid applications was miscalculated.

A department spokesman says the protests will be reviewed.

XavierUniversity in Cincinnati has announced that it will no longer provide birth control insurance coverage for employees.

The Cincinnati Enquirer reports that President of the Catholic university, Michael J. Graham,says the decision as prompted by national debate over a provision in President Barack Obama's health care law that requires insurers to provide such coverage.

Xavier says the change, announced Monday, goes into effect July 1. The university has about 950 faculty and staff and did not know how many would be affected.

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