Healthcare

WYSO/Lewis Wallace

The federal health care marketplace, a key provision of the Affordable Care Act, opened for business Tuesday even in the midst of a government shutdown. But for groups doing outreach in Dayton, the first day was a slow one.

A crew of outreach workers stood around next to colorful tables in the parking lot of a health center Tuesday, chatting up passers-by and waiting for a mostly-absent news media to stop by.

The Federal health care Marketplace is set to open for business Tuesday, Oct. 1, and open enrollment will last for six months. Most people who can’t get employer insurance will be required to sign up for health plans under the Affordable Care Act, or pay a fee. But there’s still a lot of confusion about what exactly this will mean for the uninsured — about 1.5 million people in Ohio.

Flickr/vistavision

This week the Affordable Care Act has inspired congressional faceoffs, online poetry, and a reading of "Green Eggs and Ham" on the Senate floor. Meanwhile, the federal government is scrambling to get ready for the launch of the marketplace, where Ohio’s uninsured will shop for health plans.

The federal health care marketplace is set to open Oct. 1, and Ohio organizations are scrambling to prepare. Beginning Jan. 1, 2014, almost all Americans will be required to have health care either through an employer, through a private insurer, or through a state- or federally-run marketplace. The marketplaces will essentially be regulated online shopping centers where consumers can compare health plans and find out whether they qualify for federal subsidies.

The Cost Of Expanding Medicaid Debated In Dayton

Aug 30, 2013
Flickr Creative Commons Unser 401(K)2013

The discussion over extending Medicaid came to Dayton this week. Members of the Ohio Senate Finance Subcommittee came to CareSource to hear how Medicaid expansion would affect Ohioans and the state’s bottom line. Emily McCord speaks with WYSO's economics reporter, Lewis Wallace, who reports that health care advocates point to a study that shows Ohio can expand Medicaid while saving money at the same time.


Health Care Advocates Question Ohio’s Navigator Rules

Aug 14, 2013

In preparation for the health care exchange element of the federal Affordable Care Act, the government will designate groups as navigator to help guide people through the system. But there are non-profit groups who say an Ohio law leaves them out of the process.

Soon the federal government will announce which groups can operate as navigators in Ohio, these are people who will help answer consumer questions about the Affordable Care Act and the health plans Ohioans can choose.

The federal sequestration is having a negative impact on Ohio’s public health programs. But Dr. Ted Wymyslo says it’s hard, at this point, to know exactly how much money programs are losing. He says the department has been waiting since early March to learn specifics about the cuts that will be put in place because the federal government has decided to cut back on program funding.

Ohio officials are taking a hands-off approach when it comes to promoting the federal health care law.

Ohio's insurance department says no marketing, advertising or outreach efforts are in the works by the state.

That will mean it'll be left up to providers, health centers, and others to get the word out about the law to the more than 1.5 million uninsured Ohioans. Enrollment for new benefits begins in October.

Republican Gov. John Kasich has opted to let the federal government run the state's new health insurance marketplace.

The state of Ohio has received a $2.1 million federal grant to improve criminal background checks for those home health care workers who directly serve the disabled and elderly.

The money means more thorough reviews for more than 100,000 workers who provide direct care to patients in Medicaid- and Medicare-funded settings.

Gov. John Kasich's administration says Ohio also will provide $700,000 in state funds to bolster background checks.

State officials say scammers are trying to steal Ohioans' personal information by claiming to be representatives of the new online insurance marketplaces under the federal health care law.

Lt. Gov. Mary Taylor, who is also the state's insurance director, is issuing a consumer alert after reports of scammers offering to help navigate consumers through the so-called health insurance exchanges.

Taylor says the scammers are trying to capitalize on confusion around the federal Affordable Care Act.

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