Healthcare

Ebola
Public Library of Science

As concerns spread about a worldwide Ebola crisis, Public Health Dayton and Montgomery County has setup a hotline to answer questions about the disease.

The hotline is a regional number for Champaign, Clark, Darke, Greene, Miami, Montgomery, Preble, and Shelby counties. Spokesman Bill Wharton says it’s something their organization had already been working on when the current crises arose.

Another Battle Is Brewing Over Ohio’s Medicaid Expansion

Oct 7, 2014

The expansion of Medicaid to previously uninsured Ohioans began in January and has given nearly 340,000 residents health coverage. But the program's long-term success is also uncertain, as the political battle over Medicaid expansion in Ohio is about to begin round two.

Protesters in Washington, D.C. speaking out against the Affordable Care Act in its early days.
Tabitha Kaylee Hawk / Flickr/Creative Commons

Today marks one year since the federal government started offering health plans under the Affordable Care Act on healthcare.gov, also known as the “exchange” or “marketplace.” The launch was rocky, to say the least, but for the most part the glitches and disasters have been cleared up, and the political battles have also exited center stage. What’s happening now is an unprecedented growth in the numbers of people covered in the Miami Valley—and a health care industry that’s booming.

President Barack Obama speaks about affordable health care at an event in 2013 with Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick. Despite controversy and a bumpy rollout, the president's signature bill enrolled more people than it had originally aimed for.
Eric Haynes / Governor's Office

As the time for open enrollment in federal health plans rolls back around, the federal government has announced a new round of grants for Ohio health insurance navigators.

Even after a bumpy start last year, the feds report more than 154,000 Ohio residents got new health plans through the Affordable Care Act marketplace between October 1, 2013 and May 31, 2014. People signed up through local health centers, food banks, libraries and churches, or just went online at home.

Dayton Children's Hospital

Dayton Children’s hospital broke ground Thursday on a new eight-story building on its campus. The center is part of a long-term plan to improve patient care. 

Officials at Children’s say their current facilities can’t serve all their needs.  The 260,000-square-foot tower will house a new intensive care unit for newborns, a Cancer and Blood Disorder Center, and new patient care units.

But the hospital's President and CEO, Deborah Feldman, says the long-term plan is about improving the hospital, not necessarily expanding it.

Health Coverage In Jeopardy For 6,000 Ohioans

Aug 18, 2014
The U.S. Health and Human Services Department

The federal government says about 6,000 Ohioans who signed up for the new health care law risk losing their taxpayer-subsidized insurance unless they act soon to resolve questions about their citizenship or immigration status.

Ohio health insurers are refunding more than a million dollars in premiums to small businesses and individuals for 2013, according to a report out Thursday from the Department of Health and Human Services.

It’s the last week to sign up for health plans under the Affordable Care Act—the deadline is Monday, March 31. As people continue to wade through the confusion surrounding the law, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has announced it will offer some wiggle room on the deadline.

Ohio officials are reporting over 23,000 people newly eligible for Medicaid in Ohio got enrolled in January, after Ohio Governor John Kasich decided to expand the insurance program to cover more low-income people using Affordable Care Act funds.

Medicaid can be tricky to quantify, however.

At the Montgomery County Job Center’s health care room, the people coming in are a mix—some have been on and off Medicaid, and some are signing up for subsidized care for the first time.

This week the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released a report on the effect of the Affordable Care Act on jobs. Among other things, the report says low- and middle-income workers may have less incentive to work more hours if it means losing health care subsidies.

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