Healthcare

Ohio Budget Passes Senate, Heads To House For Friday Vote

Jun 25, 2015

State senators on Thursday passed a sweeping $71.2 billion, two-year budget that provides an income tax cut for Ohioans, funds public schools and seeks to change health care policies.
 
The House is planning to vote on the measure Friday. The deadline for Republican Gov. John Kasich to sign the bill into law is Tuesday. Some things to know as the measure moves toward his desk:
 
     EDUCATION:
 

The nation’s medical colleges are predicting a looming shortage of doctors. That has a state representative proposing some changes to the laws on certified, higher-level nurses.

It’s estimated that over the next decade, the U.S. could be short by 90,000 doctors. Specialized nurses say changing state laws that govern them can help with that shortage. Candy Rinehart is a family nurse practitioner and director of Ohio State’s College of Nursing. 

Congressman Mike Turner at Delphi Hearing in 2013
WYSO

Former employees of auto parts company Delphi, including many in the Dayton area, are working to get a health care tax credit back on the agenda in Congress. About 20,000 people, many of them in Ohio, lost health care and part of their pensions during the GM bankruptcy in 2009; Delphi spun off from GM in 1999, but pensions and health care remained intertwined for employees of the parts-maker.

John McCarthy is the head of the Ohio Department of Medicaid. He appeared in Wilmington Tuesday at an event featuring providers and patients in advance of the governor's State of the State speech.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Governor John Kasich’s Department of Medicaid was in Wilmington Tuesday touting the success of Medicaid expansion and discussing ongoing reforms, including a proposal to start charging premiums to some low-income recipients.

The panel of state lawmakers looking over the budget had questions during a House Finance Committee meeting Wednesday about Medicaid, including about a proposal to require almost 100,000 Ohioans making above the federal poverty level to pay premiums. 

State Medicaid Director John McCarthy said the premiums will be $20 a month, which he said will teach recipients about monthly payments when they make enough money to buy insurance on the federal marketplace. 

Children's Hospital of Dayton

Health coverage for 130,000 Ohio children through the Children’s Health Insurance Program or CHIP is set to expire later this year. 

Ohio's Democratic U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown was at Dayton Children’s Hospital on Monday to announce his plans for extending the CHIP program set to expire in September. Brown says he’ll be the lead sponsor of legislation to address the issue.

Antwaun Brown is currently uninsured, and doesn't know yet whether he'll be able to get covered by the ACA. medicaid insurance health
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

It’s been a year now since Ohio expanded the low income health insurance program known as Medicaid, and enrollment exceeded expectations.

Jesse Thomas is the CEO of InHealth, the new CO-OP health insurance provider for Ohio.
Janet Adams / Business First

Open enrollment for health plans from the Affordable Care Act starts Saturday, and Ohioans will have more options this year. The number of companies offering insurance on Ohio’s exchange has jumped from 12 to 16, assuaging concerns that competition would decrease, rather than increase under the new law. The new entries include Dayton-based Premier Health, a health network that is branching out into the insurance market for the first time, and a CO-OP called InHealth Mutual.

With More Options, Healthcare.gov Now Open For “Window Shopping”

Nov 11, 2014
A screen shot from healthcare.gov, the website for the Affordable Care Act health plans.
WCPN

The Obama administration said Sunday that consumers could begin "window shopping" for health insurance plans on HealthCare.gov, even before the open enrollment period formally begins on Saturday, Nov. 15. You can now click a button and check out your options before enrollment officially begins.

The healthcare.gov site now offers Aetna and United Healthcare, two national insurers who shied away from Ohio last year. That means the competition has picked up.

Ebola
Public Library of Science

  The state is continuing to monitor residents who may have had contact with a Texas nurse diagnosed with the Ebola virus after returning home following a trip to northeastern Ohio. The Ebola incubation period can be as long as three weeks, meaning local residents who spent time with Amber Vinson during her Ohio trip will continue to be monitored for 21 days after last contact. For those who had contact with the nurse on her last day in the area, the incubation period runs through about Nov. 3.

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