WYSO

Healthcare

Office of Governor John Kasich

Ohio Gov. John Kasich says President Donald Trump's move last week to cut subsidies to health insurers will ultimately hurt people who won't be able to afford coverage.

Kasich appeared Sunday on NBC's "Meet the Press." Ohio is one of the states that expanded Medicaid coverage under President Barack Obama's 2010 Affordable Care Act, leading to more than 700,000 Ohioans obtaining health insurance.

Subsidies to insurers help reduce the cost some people pay for health care.

Statehouse News Bureau

The failure of the U.S. Senate’s proposed plans to repeal and replace the Affordable Health Care Act leaves the program intact. But most Senators, on both sides of the aisle, say if the program is kept, changes must be made to make it function on a long term basis. 

Republican U.S. Senator Rob Portman voted for one version of the proposals to repeal and replace the Affordable Health Care Act. He said it included provisions that he thinks would shore up the program.

The director of the Dayton VA Medical Center in southwest Ohio says he'll retire in October after nearly six years of leading the facility, which serves about 40,000 veterans annually.

Glenn Costie also oversaw the VA medical facility in Cincinnati for part of 2016. He filled in as director of the Cincinnati medical center after the head of its Ohio-based regional network was ousted and the Cincinnati hospital's then-acting chief of staff was disciplined in connection with a probe of the hospital's management and veterans' care.

Q&A on GOP Health Care Bill

Jul 11, 2017
NPR

This week, Republicans in Congress will try to rally votes behind a bill that proposes major changes to the way Americans get health care and how much they pay. Governor John Kasich has expressed concern about how this bill would affect Ohioans, particularly low-income residents and people who depend on Medicaid for their health care.  The Kasich administration has estimated as many as 500,000 Ohioans could lose their healthcare under the bill.  Use this Q&A to explore how the bill would affect you.

Premier Health provider, Miami Valley Hospital
WYSO/Joshua Chenault

Officials with Dayton-based Premier Health say contract talks with UnitedHealthCare continue despite an ongoing dispute over terms. Unless an agreement is reached, nearly 70,000 Premier patients with insurance through UnitedHealth will have to find new in-network providers.

 

Negotiations recently broke down over a disagreement between UnitedHealthcare and Premier over a push by the insurance giant to rank hospitals and providers based on cost and quality. Premier officials say the tiered system discourages customers from using Premier providers.

Char Daston / WYSO

Have you ever noticed the blue helicopters in the sky above the Miami Valley? Those are CareFlights, air ambulances from the Miami Valley Hospital. Rocky Blazer, a listener from Springfield, says they seem to fly out a lot, and asked why the hospital would decide to send out a CareFlight, rather than a traditional ambulance. I drove down to the hospital’s central campus in Dayton to investigate.

On the helipad

Thousands of Ohio residents using subsidies to pay for federally-mandated health insurance could lose that funding.
Flickr/Creative Commons

Republican Governor John Kasich's administration is moving forward with plans to require more than 1 million low-income Ohioans to pay a new monthly cost for Medicaid or potentially lose coverage.

House Republicans added the idea to the state budget enacted last summer.

The provision requires Kasich's administration to seek a waiver of federal Medicaid rules so that Ohio can require certain Medicaid recipients to pay into a health-savings account regardless of their income. The plan requires federal approval.

Jerry Kenney / WYSO

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley and several U.S. Department of Health and Human Services officials were at the Dayton Job Center Tuesday to promote the next round of open enrollment into the Federal Health Insurance Marketplace.

Whaley told reporters there are two big reasons the uninsured need to take advantage of the open enrollment periods.

State officials announce the rollout of the Centering Pregnancy program offering women a support network of prenatal care.
Jerry Kenney

  A health center in Dayton is one of four in Ohio selected to pilot a prenatal care program designed to lower the state’s infant mortality rate. Ohio ranks 47th in the nation for infant deaths, and 50th for African American populations.

State Senator Shannon Jones (R) calls the numbers abysmal.

“It’s really an indicator of how safe and healthy our women and children are in the state,” she said at a gathering to announce the program rollout.

Dayton Children's is also expanding in the city of Dayton, with this new patient tower.
Dayton Children's Hospital

The Dayton Children’s Hospital has announced a major expansion of its facilities in Springboro.

The hospital plans to spend nearly $50 million to more than double the size of its south suburban location to include a surgery center and emergency facilities.

Pages