Health

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This week the Affordable Care Act has inspired congressional faceoffs, online poetry, and a reading of "Green Eggs and Ham" on the Senate floor. Meanwhile, the federal government is scrambling to get ready for the launch of the marketplace, where Ohio’s uninsured will shop for health plans.

The federal health care marketplace is set to open Oct. 1, and Ohio organizations are scrambling to prepare. Beginning Jan. 1, 2014, almost all Americans will be required to have health care either through an employer, through a private insurer, or through a state- or federally-run marketplace. The marketplaces will essentially be regulated online shopping centers where consumers can compare health plans and find out whether they qualify for federal subsidies.

Members of the Ohio Senate Committee on Medicaid, Health, and Human Services and other health professionals from around the state will be in Cincinnati Thursday to discuss how to improve Ohio’s infant mortality rate. 

A pool of mosquitoes has tested positive for the West Nile virus in a wooded area of a southwest Ohio park.

A spokesman for Public Health-Dayton & Montgomery County says the recent test of mosquitoes in a wooded area at Dayton's Wegerzyn Gardens MetroPark was the first positive one in the region this season. Public Health planned to treat the area with insecticide.

The Dayton Daily News reports that Franklin County also had a mosquito pool test positive this summer in the Columbus area.

Ohio is the fourth worst in the nation for infant mortality and is second worst for black infant mortality. In Columbus yesterday, the state health department launched a program to aid 9 Ohio cities to work on lowering those rates. Dayton is among one of the cities chosen.

The head of Ohio's addictions agency plans to talk about new data showing state residents still dying from drug overdoses at record rates.

Orman Hall is director of the Ohio Department of Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services. He also will use a news conference Tuesday afternoon to push for addiction treatment and other health care services for all Ohioans.

Data released last week show the number of people who died of accidental overdoses jumped 14 percent in 2011 for a total of over 17 hundred overall deaths.

A former Ohio hospital worker has filed a lawsuit after she was fired for refusing to get a flu shot because she's vegan.

Sakile Chenzira was a longtime customer service representative at Cincinnati Chidlren's Hospital.  She was fired in December 2010 after refusing to get the shot because she doesn't believe in consuming any animal products.

The flu vaccine contains a small amount of egg protein.

Chenzira filed a lawsuit against the hospital in 2011 alleging religious discrimination and seeking a minimum of $650,000.  The case is now set for trial in July.

U.S. government photographer Marjory Collins

Baby boomers, 78 million strong, are turning 65 at a rate of 4 million per year. The press, the government, and the medical community claim, often and loudly, that these numbers augur a mass dependency crisis. Such spokesmen envision a world of decrepit elders afflicted with chronic disease slurping their way through the country’s resources. This month historian Tamara Mann explores how, in the United States, the so-called “geriatric crisis” is less related to age itself than to the relationship between old age and government funds, particularly Medicare.

Full episode of WYSO Weekend for January 13, 2013 including the following stories:

- Jerry Kenney talks to filmmaker Julia Reichert about ReInvention Stories, a new collaborative series on WYSO and we hear the first story in the series about the Fifth Street Brewpub.

- Emily McCord speaks with Bill Wharton from the public health department for Dayton and Montgomery County about this year's flu outbreak.

Flu Season Taking Its Toll on Ohio

Jan 10, 2013

It’s been a particularly rough flu season across the country. Boston declared a public health emergency as hospitals are overwhelmed with flu cases. The illness is talking a toll here, too, and WYSO’s Emily McCord reports that public officials it’s not too late to protect yourself.

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