Health

Full episode of WYSO Weekend for January 13, 2013 including the following stories:

- Jerry Kenney talks to filmmaker Julia Reichert about ReInvention Stories, a new collaborative series on WYSO and we hear the first story in the series about the Fifth Street Brewpub.

- Emily McCord speaks with Bill Wharton from the public health department for Dayton and Montgomery County about this year's flu outbreak.

Flu Season Taking Its Toll on Ohio

Jan 10, 2013

It’s been a particularly rough flu season across the country. Boston declared a public health emergency as hospitals are overwhelmed with flu cases. The illness is talking a toll here, too, and WYSO’s Emily McCord reports that public officials it’s not too late to protect yourself.

Issue 25 Fails

Nov 7, 2012

Clark County voters did not approve Issue 25 yesterday. The Developmental Disabilities Board there was seeking approval of a new, 1.75 million, eight year levy. WYSO's Wayne Baker reports that the issue failed by more than 1,100 votes.

According to unofficial results with 100 percent of the precincts reporting, Issue 25 failed by a count of 51 to 49 percent. More than 30,000 voters were against the measure and 29,000 voted to approve it.

The number of teen births in Ohio is still declining.

The rate of women 19 and younger who gave birth in Ohio fell for the fourth consecutive year in 2011. That's according to an analysis by The Dayton Daily News of preliminary state data.

Ohio Department of Health statistics show that the 12,189 teen births last year were down 11 percent from 2010. And it was the fewest recorded since the state began keeping track in 1990.

The state of Ohio is cracking down on pharmacies that custom-mix individualized prescriptions after a deadly fungal meningitis outbreak linked to a Massachusetts compounding company.

Jesse L. Wimberly, pharmacy inspector for the Ohio State Board of Pharmacy, tells the Dayton Daily News that the state is checking all 17 pharmacies statewide that custom-mix compound prescriptions. Those pharmacies are typically inspected at least once every three years.

Full episode of WYSO Weekend for October 28, 2012 including the following stories:

- Jerry Kenney speaks with representatives from Free to Breathe Dayton about their mission and their upcoming Lung Cancer 5K and run/walk

- Poor Will's Almanack: October 23 - 29, 2012, by Bill Felker

- PoliticsOhio: Turner Stands On His Record For Reelection, Sequestration And Delphi, by Emily McCord

As the 40th anniversary of Roe v. Wade, the US Supreme Court case legalizing abortion, approaches, many Americans assume that legalized abortion is only as old as that ruling. In fact, as Anna Peterson discusses this month, abortion had only been made illegal at the turn of the 20th century. The different histories of abortion in Europe and the United States reveal much about the current state of American debates-so prominent in the 2012 elections campaigns-over abortion and women's health.

Health officials say an E. coli outbreak that began with people who ate at a southwest Ohio picnic has reached 68 cases, and three people are in serious condition.

The illnesses were first reported in Germantown, southwest of Dayton, after a July 3 customer appreciation picnic for a lawn care business.

A spokesman for the Montgomery County health department says more than a dozen people have been hospitalized. A 4-year-old girl, a 14-year-old boy and a 73-year-old man remained hospitalized Tuesday with complications from the bacteria.

Full episode of WYSO Weekend for July 15, 2012 containing the following stories:

-Jerry Kenney spoke with Marcy Sidell of the Drug-Free Action Alliance about a new drop-box program in Ohio for prescription pills.

-Ohio Public Radio's Bill Cohen reports on the Ohio Attorney General's concern over prescription pill theft in the state's nursing homes.

-New Ohio Guide: Maria Stein, by Aileen LeBlanc

Francis Storr

A decision by Ohio Governor John Kasich to change the way doctors can bill Medicaid for a painkiller addition treatment may make it easier to obtain in the long run.  The administration says the change could ultimately affect far more patients than a $1 million pilot program for ex-offenders vetoed by the governor last month.

Under the new change taking effect in October, pharmacies can bill Medicaid directly for Vivitrol and have the drug delivered to a doctor's office without an upfront payment.

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