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Health

The Gem City Market project has received a $220,000 Grant from insurance giant CareSource. "We are thrilled to receive this vote of confidence from Caresource," says Amaha Sellassie, Gem City Market Board President.
Gem City Market

Thousands of West Dayton residents who lack easy access to fresh fruits and vegetables could soon have a full-service food market close to home.

 

The west side has been without a convenient source of fresh produce since 2008, when a neighborhood Kroger grocery store shut down. Since then, city officials have tried attracting a new grocer without success.

 

Opioid overdose survivors can experience physical and mental health problems, long after they're revived with naloxone.
Renee Wilde / WYSO

In Springfield, most calls to the city’s 911 emergency switchboard are related to an opioid overdose.

Some overdose victims will die. Many others will be saved with the fast-acting overdose reversal drug Narcan.

But, for some surviving overdose victims, that’s not the end of the story. An overdose can leave behind lasting mental and physical scars, advocates say.

The​ ​drug​ ​Narcan​ ​can​ ​seem​ ​like​​ ​magic​.​ ​Just​ ​one shot​ ​of​ ​the​ ​powerful​ medicine ​can​ ​literally​ ​bring​ ​an overdose victim ​back​ ​from​ ​the​ ​dead.​

3D body scans generate hundreds of 360-degree measurements.
Fit3D

Numbers show more and more Americans are turning to technology for help staying healthy and losing weight. Mobile step and calorie counters, fitness apps and wearable technology such as Fitbits are more popular than ever. With the season of holiday overindulgence underway, WYSO’s Jerry Kenney tested one of the newest fitness trends to hit the Miami Valley.

Yellow Springs Senior Center

A recent RAND Corporation study found more than 14 percent of Americans age 71 or older had dementia in 2010. Now, some communities across the country are working to make life easier for people with the disease. Among them is the Village of Yellow Springs.

 

The movement to create so-called “dementia-friendly” communities began in 2015. Within a year cities in more than 20 states had adopted the dementia-friendly status.

 

 

On Saturday, September 16 Miami Valley residents will once again take part in Dayton Free to Breathe’s annual 5K Run/Walk to support lung cancer research.

The event moves to a new venue this year and will be held at The Dayton Raceway at Hollywood Gaming.

Kathleen Fennig, a lung cancer survivor, is the local event coordinator for Free to Breathe. She says her involvement with the organization is a direct result of her diagnosis.

Dayton CareSource Employees Rally To Protect Medicaid

Jul 5, 2017
More than a hundred Caresource employees loaded onto buses Wednesday morning to attend a rally at the statehouse in support of Medicaid expansion.
Kristin Stratman / WYSO

About 130 CareSource employees loaded onto buses Wednesday morning to attend a rally at the statehouse in support of Medicaid expansion. Gov. John Kasich’s budget signed Friday included a veto on a plan to freeze Medicaid expansion next year. Some state lawmakers are threatening to override the governor’s veto in ongoing budget negotiations this week.

   

Karen Gardner repeal Affordable Care Act american health care act trump
Courtesy Karen Gardner

Republican legislation to dismantle the Affordable Care Act is on its way to the Senate.

Thousands of Ohio residents using subsidies to pay for federally-mandated health insurance could lose that funding.
Flickr/Creative Commons

Ohio health-care advocates are reacting to Thursday's passage of a GOP health bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. The bill is far from becoming reality. But, if passed into law, the “American Health Care Act” would make a long list of changes to the country’s health-care system.  

Flu Hospitalizations Continue To Rise

Feb 13, 2017

The ongoing surge in flu cases is sending more people to hospitals across the state of Ohio, and Greene County public health officials are urging families to take preventative measures. According to the Ohio Department of Health, at least three children have died in the last two weeks due to the predominant strain of flu this year, H3N2.

 

Amy Schmitt is a registered nurse and reporter of infectious diseases at the Greene County Health Department. She says families need to take regular precautions.

 

A new state report shows an uptick in Ohio's infant mortality rate, with black babies dying at a rate approaching three times that of whites.

Data released Wednesday by the Ohio Department of Health shows the state's overall infant mortality rate increased to 7.2 deaths per 1,000 births last year. That's up from a rate of 6.8 deaths in 2014. The three leading causes continued to be prematurity, sleep-related deaths and birth defects.

Ohio had 1,005 infants die before their first birthdays in 2015, compared with 955 in 2014.

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