Health

U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Bryan Franks / public domain

Free health screenings, a community baby shower and health information forums are among the Dayton events happening in April as part of so-called National Minority Health Month. 

The month's events kicked off last week at the Neon Theatre, with a Dayton Council on Health Equity gathering aimed at promoting health improvement and awareness in Miami Valley communities of color.

 

Asian American Council

The Asian American Council (AAC) of Dayton and participating organizations hope that expanded health and fitness services will attract more people, including young audiences, to their annual health expo.

With that goal in mind, they have added fitness elements, including group and individual instruction classes in a variety of disciplines to the event.

Dayton VA Medical Center

The Dayton VA Medical Center is launching a new effort to reach out to veterans who may qualify for health benefits.

The organization is hosting its first ever Benefits Enrollment Fair Thursday, March 29. The event is aimed at helping veterans and their families navigate the often complex sign-up system.

Ted Froats, a spokesperson for the Dayton VA Medical Center and a veteran of the Iraq War, says like many veterans, he wasn’t sure if he qualified for medical benefits when returned to civilian life.

Some health advocates want to legalize a controversial practice they say would make routine dentistry more accessible and affordable for the most underserved Ohioans.
April Laissle / WYSO

More than half of Ohio counties don’t have enough dentists for the population. Numbers show the dental shortages are especially severe in many rural and low-income communities.

Ann Naber, a member of the Ohio Dental Hygienist Association (ODHA) and an instructor at Sinclair Community College, says this lack of access can lead to severe -- and often expensive -- health consequences for many people.

Kettering Health Network, on Tuesday, broke ground on a $25 million expansion of Grandview Hospital. Officials with the nonprofit health network say the expansion will add space and double the hospital’s emergency rooms and services. Those added services could help residents affected by the closure of nearby Good Samaritan Hospital.  

 

Kettering Health Network president Roy Chew says the decision to expand is a direct result of Premier Health Network’s decision to close Good Samaritan Hospital later this year.

Paulo Marrucho / Flickr Creative Commons

The number of transplants using organs from people who fatally overdosed on drugs is rising in central Ohio and the nation.

The Columbus Dispatch reports the nonprofit group Lifeline Ohio had a record number of donors and recipients in 2017 and a 37 percent increase in the number of organs transplanted. Lifeline is the organ-donation organization for 37 Ohio counties and two counties in West Virginia.

The state announced a dozen marijuana-cultivation licenses for locations across Ohio.
Paige Filler on Flickr Creative Commons

In 2016, Ohio became the 25th state to legalize medical marijuana. Since then, the state has been trying to implement the program, but that process hasn’t been entirely smooth. Many local municipalities have been reluctant to get on board.

WYSO’s April Laissle spoke with Wright State University political science professor Dr. Lee Hannah about the state’s progress and how a recent announcement by U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions may affect Ohio’s burgeoning medical marijuana industry.

The Gem City Market project has received a $220,000 Grant from insurance giant CareSource. "We are thrilled to receive this vote of confidence from Caresource," says Amaha Sellassie, Gem City Market Board President.
Gem City Market

Thousands of West Dayton residents who lack easy access to fresh fruits and vegetables could soon have a full-service food market close to home.

 

The west side has been without a convenient source of fresh produce since 2008, when a neighborhood Kroger grocery store shut down. Since then, city officials have tried attracting a new grocer without success.

 

Opioid overdose survivors can experience physical and mental health problems, long after they're revived with naloxone.
Renee Wilde / WYSO

In Springfield, most calls to the city’s 911 emergency switchboard are related to an opioid overdose.

Some overdose victims will die. Many others will be saved with the fast-acting overdose reversal drug Narcan.

But, for some surviving overdose victims, that’s not the end of the story. An overdose can leave behind lasting mental and physical scars, advocates say.

The​ ​drug​ ​Narcan​ ​can​ ​seem​ ​like​​ ​magic​.​ ​Just​ ​one shot​ ​of​ ​the​ ​powerful​ medicine ​can​ ​literally​ ​bring​ ​an overdose victim ​back​ ​from​ ​the​ ​dead.​

3D body scans generate hundreds of 360-degree measurements.
Fit3D

Numbers show more and more Americans are turning to technology for help staying healthy and losing weight. Mobile step and calorie counters, fitness apps and wearable technology such as Fitbits are more popular than ever. With the season of holiday overindulgence underway, WYSO’s Jerry Kenney tested one of the newest fitness trends to hit the Miami Valley.

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