Guns

Springfield police are still looking for a 17-year-old Clark County man in connection with the murder of a Springfield High School student. Now, several law enforcement agencies have joined in the search for the suspect.

Jeffrey Wellington, a 17-year-old student-athlete, was shot and killed Sunday morning. Police have issued a warrant for the arrest of Tyrin Hawkins who was also a student at Springfield High School.

US Marshals have joined the search for Hawkins, along with the Southern Ohio Fugitive Apprehension Strike Team.

Police have named a suspect involved in the shooting that claimed the life of a 17-year-old Springfield High School student early Sunday morning. A murder warrant has been issued for the Clark County teenager.

Springfield Police have been investigating the death of student-athlete Jeffrey Wellington early Sunday morning in the 2300 block of North Limestone Street. Police Chief Stephen Moody's office says a warrant has been issued for 17-year-old Tyrin Hawkins of Springfield.

Adam Hill

A forum in Dayton tonight will focus on gun violence in the city. It's the first of four events hosted by the Community Initiative to Reduce Gun Violence (CIRVG).  The group's work has already made a positive impact.  

Gun violence has actually declined in the last decade. Since the CIRGV program began in 2008, group-related gun violence dropped 86% in its first four years. 

But program director Sean Walton, says there are still disturbing trends taking place in Dayton neighborhoods, and there's more work to do. 

State officials say there's been a big surge in concealed carry permits in Ohio this year.

The Ohio attorney general's office says just over 82,000 permits had been issued through the end of September.

That's more than all of last year and a record for the state.

Ohio's concealed-carry law allows people with firearms-safety training to apply for a license through county sheriff's departments.

A spokesman with Ohioans for Concealed Carry tells The Columbus Dispatch that there's an upward trend of people wanting to carry out their Second Amendment rights.

Ohio lawmakers are taking up a bill that would change gun laws in Ohio. Some are calling this Ohio’s Stand Your Ground bill. But backers of this legislation say that’s not a good way to portray it.

Dayton Opposes "Stand Your Ground" Bill

Aug 29, 2013

The city of Dayton introduced a resolution Wednesday that opposes “stand your ground” legislation being considered at the Ohio house.

Right now, Ohio law says you have the right to defend yourself if you’re in your home. But if you’re outside, you have to retreat. If House Bill 203 is passed, it would allow you to fight back anywhere.

Dayton is the first city in the state to come out against the proposed legislation. Commissioner Nan Whaley says it won’t help the city’s initiative to reduce gun violence, and that citizens have raised concerns about the bill.

Ohio could see a record-breaking number of new licenses for carrying a concealed weapon this year.

The state's attorney general says county sheriffs issued more than 63,000 new licenses in the first half of the year. With the exception of last year, that six-month figure tops the yearly total of new licenses issued since they were first given out in 2004.

Attorney General Mike DeWine described the increase as "phenomenal," but said he could only speculate on the reasons. He noted that more people are becoming familiar with the law.

A newspaper analysis finds an increase in the number of gun-related bills brought forth by the Ohio Legislature.

The report by the Cincinnati Enquirer says lawmakers have introduced 19 firearm-related bills since taking office in January, 11 of them expanding gun owners' rights.

The paper says in a story Thursday that that's five more than the 14 firearm-related bills introduced in 2011 and 2012.

A pro-gun group in Ohio has raised more than 12,000 dollars to buy George Zimmerman a new firearm. He is the former neighborhood watch volunteer who was acquitted of all charges in the fatal killing of the unarmed teen, Trayvon Martin, in Florida.

Federal statistics show that Ohio is a top source for guns used in crimes in other states.

The data released this week and reported by The Columbus Dispatch show 1,601 guns were first legally purchased in Ohio in 2012 and then linked to crimes such as robbery and murder in 36 other states.

Another 5,375 guns stayed in Ohio and were linked to crimes in 2012, according to the newspaper analysis of numbers from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

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