green business

The St. Kateri Preserve at Calvary Cemetery is among a handful of green burial options in the area.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The “green” movement is headed underground—to the grave, that is. More and more cemeteries around the country are offering burial options that use fewer materials and less energy; some are landscaped with native plants and trees. These simplified burials can also be cheaper—but there’s often a catch.

At a dedication ceremony for the St. Kateri Preserve at Calvary Cemetery in Dayton, Marge Devito and her husband Bill watch as a priest blesses the site. Bill has a terminal illness—and they love the idea of burying him in a nature preserve.

Logo / Dayton Regional Green

The City of Dayton and Montgomery County moved this week to sign resolutions to make the region more “green” in the coming years. Leaders are encouraging businesses to take on basic environmental practices, and asking individuals to do more recycling and energy conservation.

The city and county’s goals for the Dayton Regional Green Initiative include certifying 1,500 companies as “green,” and planting 100,000 trees by 2016. They also want 25 percent of the region’s waste to be recycled.