Governor John Kasich

The state of Ohio is spending nearly $50,000 to launch a campaign to raise awareness of the problem of human trafficking.

Gov. John Kasich said Wednesday that the state is working with a Hudson public relations firm to develop a "multi-pronged outreach and education campaign" that is expected to be introduced before the end of the year.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich has signed a bill requiring Ohio courts to report certain mental health information for inclusion in a law enforcement database.

The bill signed Tuesday is named after a Clark County sheriff's deputy who was fatally shot two years ago. State Representatives Chris Widener from Springfield and Bill Beagle from Tipp city joined the governor for the signing of the Deputy Suzanne Hopper Act.

Emily McCord

Governor Kasich was in Wilmington Thursday to highlight new jobs coming to the city. As Emily McCord reports, the Governor was joined by local officials and business leaders to celebrate commitments by companies to create more than 500 jobs.

Ohio Governor John Kasich says he is not giving up his push for expansion of Medicaid as part of the proposed two year state budget. Some groups have suggested putting the issue on the ballot so that Ohioans can decide whether to expand Medicaid. Governor Kasich says he’s not opposed to that idea.

It looks like Medicaid expansion won’t likely be part of the proposed two year state budget that will come out of the Ohio Senate.

Governor John Kasich, Business leaders and even Democrats want Medicaid expansion in the Ohio Budget.  But Republican Ohio Senate President Keith Faber says that’s unlikely.

"You need two chambers to move a bill and the house has indicated they simply don’t have the votes to get Medicaid expansion done in the budget," says Faber.  "Therefore I do not believe Medicaid expansion is on the table as it relates to this legislation in the budget."

Gov. John Kasich's plan to expand health care coverage for low-income Ohioans has been dealt another blow.

A top Republican in the Ohio Legislature says the Senate's version of the state budget won't include the governor's proposed Medicaid expansion.

Senate President Keith Faber said Wednesday that he's pushing for changes to the Medicaid program instead of the wide-ranging expansion plan.

Lawmakers in the Ohio House already had stripped the Medicaid proposal that's a key element of President Barack Obama's signature health care law.

In this week's PoliticsOhio, Emily McCord speaks to Statehouse Bureau reporters Bill Cohen and Jo Ingles to discuss the Ohio House version of the budget, which includes a 7% income tax cut for Ohioans, a rejection of Governor Kasich's proposal to extend Medicaid coverage and the tax on oil and gas drillers. Jo Ingles reports the house also got rid of a plan to ban educator's for talking about "gateway sex", but that it's a conversation that's likely to come up again.

A state budget that gives schools half the innovation money sought by the governor, scraps his plans to expand Medicaid and sends Planned Parenthood to the back of the line for public family planning dollars is expected to advance a step in the Ohio House.

The House Finance and Appropriations Committee is expected to make additional changes before it votes on the two-year, $61.4 billion measure Tuesday afternoon. A full House vote could come on Thursday.

An estimated two thousand five hundred Ohioans stood out in the pouring rain at the state’s capitol today to do one thing – send a message to lawmakers to expand Medicaid in the state budget.

Democrats, Union leaders, Faith leaders of many different churches and leaders of business groups rally at the Ohio Statehouse….holding signs and chanting to lawmakers inside the building.

On Tuesday, Republicans in the Ohio House put forth a budget proposal that included an education funding formula quite different than the one Governor John Kasich put forward in his two year spending blueprint. 

Many welcomed the news that, under Governor Kasich’s plan, no schools would see their funding levels cut from the previous year. Yet, 60% of Ohio schools would get no funding increase, including some poorer districts, and some wealthy districts would have seen fairly large funding increases.

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