Governor John Kasich

Governor Delays Next Scheduled Execution

Feb 10, 2014

The controversial way in which a murderer was executed has sparked heavy scrutiny from groups around the country. Now Governor Kasich has delayed the next scheduled execution.

Convicted murderer Gregory Lott was slated for lethal injection on March 19, but the governor has moved that execution date to November 19.

Ohio's Republican and Democratic gubernatorial front-runners are headed toward a primary-free showdown, ending a shakeout marked by complaints that both major parties got too aggressive in pushing out challengers.

The Democrats had a primary looming until last Friday, when Hamilton County Commissioner Todd Portune quietly withdrew his late bid against Cuyahoga County Executive Ed FitzGerald.

Republican state Reps. Tony Burkley and Brian Hill have introduced a plan to add four calamity days this year following a call from Gov. Kasich  who said many schools have exhausted their five allowable days off for snow or bad weather, or soon will. 

John Charlton at the Ohio Department of Education explains the Governor thinks many schools are going to exhaust the five calamity days now currently allowed by law. And Charlton says the hope is the extra calamity days will make it safer for school children.

A civil-rights organization is asking Ohio Gov. John Kasich to immediately halt executions after a condemned inmate gasped and snorted last week as an untested drug combination was used to put him to death.

The ACLU of Ohio made its request to Kasich on Sunday, noting Ohio has five upcoming executions scheduled.

Death row inmate Dennis McGuire was executed Thursday. And it was the longest execution since Ohio resumed capital punishment in 1999. McGuire's adult children said it amounted to torture and his family says they're suing.

WHIO

The Democratic candidate for governor in 2014, Ed FitzGerald, is expected to announce a new pick for running mate today: attorney Sharen Neuhardt of Yellow Springs.

Neuhardt has run for U.S. Congress twice, most recently losing to Congressman Mike Turner of Ohio’s 10th District.

Despite never having held public office, she says she’s qualified.

 

A challenge to Republican Governor John Kasich by the Tea Party was over before it even began. Southwest Ohio Tea Party activist Ted Stevenot decided not to run after it was discovered that his potential running mate, Brenda Mack, had tax issues, debt and other financial problems. The Tea Party says it still plans to put up another candidate to challenge Kasich, but Jo Ingles with the Ohio Public Radio Statehouse News Bureau says the situation underscores the loss of political clout for the Tea Party.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The state of Ohio has announced plans for Chinese auto-glass manufacturer Fuyao to take over more than a million square feet of the former General Motors plant in Moraine, south of Dayton. The news is a major breakthrough for southwest Ohio, which has been struggling for decades with the slow trickle-out of major American manufacturers from the area.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

On Wednesday, Ohio Governor John Kasich announced the launch of a statewide drug education program called “Start Talking.” The program encourages parents and teachers to talk to young people about the dangers of heroin and prescription drugs.

At the launch event at West Carrollton Middle School south of Dayton, many of the speeches were emotional.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Governor Kasich’s Democratic challenger Ed FitzGerald spoke at the Ahiska Turk Community Center in Dayton on Wednesday, harshly criticizing the Republican governor’s economic policies.

The party line at FitzGerald’s Dayton event: Kasich takes from poor, and gives to the rich.

“His budgets have undeniably been a tax shift away from the poor and middle class,” said newly-minted city commissioner Jeffrey Mims, “and moving towards doing everything they can to help his buddies and his friends who are at the top of the financial food chain.

An Ohio tea party leader says the movement is working to recruit a new primary challenger to Republican Gov. John Kasich after their first contender backed out of the race late Saturday.

Tom Zawistowski tells The Associated Press that leader and activist Ted Stevenot's withdrawal less than a week after entering the contest was personal.

Zawistowski said tea party supporters still hope to field an alternative to Kasich by the Feb. 5 deadline.

Pages