Governor John Kasich

Kasich Budget Trims Aid To Over Half Of Ohio Districts

Feb 3, 2015

More than half of Ohio's public school districts would get less money from the state under Gov. John Kasich's proposed education budget as the administration seeks to adjust the funding formula to better reflect district incomes.

Those cuts come even as Kasich's $72.3 billion, two-year budget increases state foundation funding by $700 million over two years.

The state budget director and superintendent both said the spending blueprint doles out state education aid under a formula adjusted to better reflect a district's wealth.

Arise Academy in Dayton is now closed, and former leaders of the school have been convicted of federal crimes.
Paradox 56 / Flickr Creative Commons

Governor Kasich’s proposed two-year budget makes big changes to the formula used to fund K-12 schools. He says those districts that have the highest property wealth and the highest income from taxpayers will get less money from the state.  And he knows that might mean many suburban schools will be flat funded, or even face cuts.

Ohio Statehouse News Bureau

Ohio's budget director says the governor's two-year spending plan would continue to fund an expansion of the Medicaid health program.
 
Republican Gov. John Kasich's administration extended Medicaid eligibility in 2013 to cover thousands more low-income residents, as allowed under President Barack Obama's health care law. Kasich needs legislative approval to continue funding it after June.
 
Budget director Tim Keen said Monday that Kasich's budget appropriates money to continue the expansion.
 

Office of Governor John Kasich

Today’s the day Gov. John Kasich unveils his third budget, which is expected to include $500 million in tax cuts plus benefits to lower-income Ohioans. But he has yet to talk about how he’ll pay for those.

Kasich wants to cut taxes on many small businesses and increase some tax benefits for lower-income Ohioans. And he’ll likely pay for those plans with a proposal to hike the tax on oil and natural gas drillers. But Kasich also suggested in December that he’ll take another swing at an increase in the tobacco tax.

Jerry Kenney/WYSO

The Dayton Development Coalition and the Ohio Federal-Military Jobs Commission (OFMJC) held a forum at Wright State University’s Nutter Center on Thursday to discuss federal job retention and expansion in the state.  

Governor Kasich signed the commission into law in 2014 to make Ohio more competitive in job growth by leveraging the state’s military assets like Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.

Akron Sgt. From left, Brian Armstead, former U.S. Rep. Louis Stokes and former State Sen. Nina Turner.
Nick Castele / WCPN

A state task force on police-community relations that includes lawmakers, pastors and police held its first meeting Tuesday night in Cleveland.

Out of an audience of dozens, about 20 people testified – some shared stories about treatment by police. Others recommended collecting data on racial profiling in Ohio, training officers to respond to people with mental illness, and setting up an independent panel to review police shootings. Many speakers urged the task force to consider race in its final proposals.

The race track at the north Dayton racino under construction in 2014. Racino owner Penn National can't agree with the state of Ohio on a relocation payment to the city of Dayton.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The mayor of Dayton says the state needs to act soon to get the city a $500,000 racino payment it’s owed by law. The money got hung up at the very end of the recent lame-duck session, when Governor John Kasich vetoed a line-item amendment to a bill that resolved a long-standing dispute over the money.

State lawmakers are requiring a police officer be posted at each camera, which essentially bans the practice.
Creative Commons

Just as state lawmakers pass a bill that will likely end most traffic camera programs in Ohio, the state’s highest court has ruled cities have the authority to use those red light and speed cameras.

The lawyer for ticketed-driver Bradley Walker argued before the Ohio Supreme Court in June that Toledo’s administrative hearing process to appeal a traffic citation was unconstitutional because state lawmakers haven’t specifically allowed it. He says appeals should have to go through municipal court. Toledo Law Director Adam Loukx disagreed. 

Organizations are grumbling about a requirement from the Ohio Department of Education to include a faith-based group for a mentorship program.
ohio.gov

The state’s leading civil rights organization is planning a public records request to find out more about a state-supported mentoring program for schools. 

Ohio Superintendent of Public Instruction Richard Ross, who is an appointee of Gov. John Kasich, says schools that want to join the Community Connections program can partner with a business or a non-profit. But must also have a faith-based organization on board.

Backers of the controversial measure called the "heartbeat bill" being considered in the Ohio House are trying a new strategy to get Ohio lawmakers to pass it during the lame duck session. The bill would make abortion illegal at the point a fetal heartbeat can be detected.

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