Gay Marriage

A federal judge has ordered Ohio authorities to recognize the marriages of gay couples performed in other states.  Judge Timothy Black's ruling on Monday criticized the state's "ongoing arbitrary discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation."

He says the state's marriage recognition bans are unconstitutional and unenforceable.

Rick Cauthen and his partner of nine years, were married in New York in 2012. He says when they had their taxes done this year, it was a reminder that Ohio considers their marriage invalid.

The group that’s pushing a same-sex marriage amendment in Ohio says it’s retooling the language because of concerns about religious institutions.

Ian James of Freedom Ohio says language about recognition of same-sex marriages by religious institutions has been taken out, and that the group will start circulating the new petitions as soon as possible. But he says they still have the signatures they need to put the original issue on the ballot with a filing deadline of July 2.

Wayne Baker

The latest Town Hall style meeting regarding marriage equality in Ohio took place  in Springfield Wednesday. Leaders from two organizations fighting to make gay marriage legal in Ohio discussed how the next two years will be crucial in making that dream a reality.

Why Marriage Matters Ohio and Equality Ohio have held several Town Hall style meetings to push for legalizing gay marriage.

Flickr Creative Commons User Stéfan

A new poll finds that Ohioans are closely divided when it comes to gay marriage. A Quinnipiac  University poll released Monday shows that 50 percent of Ohio voters support gay marriage while 44 percent are against it.

The survey also finds that Ohio voters under age 30 overwhelmingly back the idea while those 65 and older opposed it.

Gay marriage supporters are working to put the issue back on the Ohio ballot in November. There also have been recent lawsuits aimed at seeking the recognition of gay marriage in Ohio.

If a same sex couple who is married in another state has a child together, only one parent’s name can be listed on an Ohio birth certificate. Now a lawsuit has been filed that would change that.

Cincinnati Attorney Al Gerhardstein says it is unfair that two heterosexual married parents of a child can have both of their names listed on a birth certificate yet two married homosexual parents have to choose just one name to put on that document.

A group that is trying to put a ballot issue before voters next fall to allow them to overturn the state’s ban on gay marriage says a new poll shows most Ohioans will vote to pass it, but critics are not so sure that poll is accurate.

When Ian James of Freedom to Marry commissioned a recent poll, he had pollsters ask specific questions about the amendment his group wants to put on the ballot.  And he says the numbers in this poll show a majority of Ohioans are ready to pass the amendment his group is backing.

A federal judge who recently ordered the out-of-state marriages of two gay couples to be recognized in Ohio has infuriated some conservatives who say he should be impeached.

Judge Timothy Seymour Black's ruling in favor of the two couples comes despite a statewide constitutional ban on gay marriage.

The two couples, each struggling with the death, sued state authorities to have their marriages recognized on death certificates.

A lawsuit seeking to have the marriages of two gay couples recognized on death certificates has been expanded to include all similarly situated couples in Ohio, despite a statewide gay marriage ban.

Attorneys are asking a federal judge to require Ohio's health department to order all funeral directors and coroners in the state to list gay clients as married if they were legally wed in other states.

Judge Timothy Black approved a request to expand the lawsuit Wednesday.

Same Sex Marriage Advocates Launch Campaign

Sep 10, 2013

A coalition supporting same-sex marriage announced a new initiative yesterday in Ohio’s three largest cities.

A couple dozen supporters gathered outside Trinity Cathedral in downtown Cleveland, as organizers announced the creation of “Why Marriage Matters Ohio”.  Its goal is to educate state residents on marriage equality, and help build support to overturn Ohio’s ban on gay marriage.  The ban was approved by nearly two-thirds of voters in 2004.

A judge has ordered that a recently deceased Ohio man be listed on his death certificate as married and his husband must be listed as his spouse despite Ohio's gay marriage ban.

Judge Timothy Black's order Tuesday came just hours after attorneys asked him to rule quickly so that 54-year-old William Herbert Ives is listed as married on his death certificate before being cremated on Wednesday.

Ives and David Michener had been together for 18 years and have three adopted children. They married in Delaware on July 22, but Ives died unexpectedly a week ago.

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