Gay Marriage

Ohio gay same-sex marriage equality
Al Behrman / AP

Advocates on both sides of the issue are planning to turn out to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit in Cincinnati as oral arguments begin Wednesday afternoon in same-sex marriage cases from Ohio, Michigan, Kentucky and Tennessee. Capacity crowds are expected at the Potter Stewart courtroom in Cincinnati where two overflow rooms for spectators have been set-up.

Groups that favor gay marriage are planning rallies outside the courthouse, and gay marriage opponents say they’re also gathering forces. 

Several Dayton-area small business owners are proclaiming their support for gay marriage in Ohio. In a press conference later this morning, the group Why Marriage Matters Ohio will present a list of businesses who have signed on, which include Fifth St. Brew Pub, Ghostlight Coffee, Borrowed Vintage, Omega Music, Sherwood Florist, Wheat Penny Oven and Bar, and C. Marie’s Photography.  

CINCINNATI (AP) - Ohio officials have appealed a federal judge's order to recognize the marriages of gay couples who wed in other states.
 
The state attorney general's office filed a notice of appeal with the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati on Friday.  The state is appealing federal Judge Timothy Black's ruling ordering Ohio to recognize the marriages of same-sex couples that were performed in other states.
 
Most of Black's April 14 ruling was put on hold pending the anticipated appeal.
 

It’s been a big week for advocates of same-sex marriage in Ohio. First, U.S. District Judge Timothy Black issued a ruling Monday that Ohio must recognize same-sex marriages performed in other states. On the same day,  Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine approved new language for a petition to overturn Ohio’s ban on gay marriage, allowing an effort at a voter referendum to move forward.

Ohio gay same-sex marriage equality
Al Behrman / AP

A federal judge has ruled that Ohio will have to recognize same-sex marriages performed in other states, and there are lots of legal implications to recognizing these out-of-state marriages. The ruling concerns birth certificates for the children of four gay couples, but marriage law can also touch on adoption, health care, and, of course, taxes.

A federal judge has ordered Ohio authorities to recognize the marriages of gay couples performed in other states.  Judge Timothy Black's ruling on Monday criticized the state's "ongoing arbitrary discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation."

He says the state's marriage recognition bans are unconstitutional and unenforceable.

Rick Cauthen and his partner of nine years, were married in New York in 2012. He says when they had their taxes done this year, it was a reminder that Ohio considers their marriage invalid.

The group that’s pushing a same-sex marriage amendment in Ohio says it’s retooling the language because of concerns about religious institutions.

Ian James of Freedom Ohio says language about recognition of same-sex marriages by religious institutions has been taken out, and that the group will start circulating the new petitions as soon as possible. But he says they still have the signatures they need to put the original issue on the ballot with a filing deadline of July 2.

Wayne Baker

The latest Town Hall style meeting regarding marriage equality in Ohio took place  in Springfield Wednesday. Leaders from two organizations fighting to make gay marriage legal in Ohio discussed how the next two years will be crucial in making that dream a reality.

Why Marriage Matters Ohio and Equality Ohio have held several Town Hall style meetings to push for legalizing gay marriage.

Flickr Creative Commons User Stéfan

A new poll finds that Ohioans are closely divided when it comes to gay marriage. A Quinnipiac  University poll released Monday shows that 50 percent of Ohio voters support gay marriage while 44 percent are against it.

The survey also finds that Ohio voters under age 30 overwhelmingly back the idea while those 65 and older opposed it.

Gay marriage supporters are working to put the issue back on the Ohio ballot in November. There also have been recent lawsuits aimed at seeking the recognition of gay marriage in Ohio.

If a same sex couple who is married in another state has a child together, only one parent’s name can be listed on an Ohio birth certificate. Now a lawsuit has been filed that would change that.

Cincinnati Attorney Al Gerhardstein says it is unfair that two heterosexual married parents of a child can have both of their names listed on a birth certificate yet two married homosexual parents have to choose just one name to put on that document.

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