Gay Marriage

Gay Marriage Cases Teed Up For Justices' Action

Dec 23, 2014

Gay marriage cases have been added to the Supreme Court's agenda, with enough time for them to be argued and decided by late June.

The justices, following Tuesday's move, could decide as early as Jan. 9 to add same-sex marriage to their calendar this term. That date is the first time the justices will meet in private in the new year to consider adding new cases they actually will hear.

Most cases they accept for review by mid-January will be argued in late April. The court would then have about two months to reach a decision.

Same-sex Couples File Supreme Court Appeal

Nov 14, 2014

Same-sex couples seeking the right to marry are asking the Supreme Court to settle the issue of gay marriage nationwide. 

Appeals being filed Friday urge the justices to review last week's lower court ruling that upheld anti-gay marriage laws in Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio and Tennessee.

The ruling by the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals was the first appellate ruling to side with states seeking to preserve gay marriage bans since the Supreme Court struck down part of a federal anti-gay marriage law last year.

Jonund/Flickr

A federal appeals court in Cincinnati has upheld anti-gay marriage laws in four states, breaking ranks with lower courts that have considered the issue.

  In early August, the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals panel heard arguments on gay marriage bans or restrictions in Ohio, Michigan, Kentucky and Tennessee. In the ruling announced Thursday, the court split two to one on the decision with Circuit Judge Jeffrey Sutton writing the majority opinion.

Office of Governor John Kasich

Republican Ohio Governor John Kasich says he continues to support the state’s ban on same-sex marriage, even as similar prohibitions are being struck down by the courts. In an interview earlier this week, Kasich said he supports the 2004 amendment defining marriage as only between one man and one woman, even though recent court rulings mean 60 percent of Americans live in a state that does or will recognize same-sex marriage.

Flickr Creative Commons User Stéfan

  The U.S. Supreme Court's has rejected appeals from five states seeking to prohibit same-sex marriage, but the fight isn’t over in Ohio.

The Supreme Court’s decision to turn away appeals from Indiana, Oklahoma, Utah, Virginia and Wisconsin means 60 percent of the U.S. population lives in a state where same-sex marriages will be recognized. Ohio still isn’t one of them, but Al Gerhardstein, who’s the attorney in two cases filed against Ohio’s same-sex marriage ban, says he thinks change is inevitable.

Ohio gay same-sex marriage equality
Al Behrman / AP

Advocates on both sides of the issue are planning to turn out to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit in Cincinnati as oral arguments begin Wednesday afternoon in same-sex marriage cases from Ohio, Michigan, Kentucky and Tennessee. Capacity crowds are expected at the Potter Stewart courtroom in Cincinnati where two overflow rooms for spectators have been set-up.

Groups that favor gay marriage are planning rallies outside the courthouse, and gay marriage opponents say they’re also gathering forces. 

Several Dayton-area small business owners are proclaiming their support for gay marriage in Ohio. In a press conference later this morning, the group Why Marriage Matters Ohio will present a list of businesses who have signed on, which include Fifth St. Brew Pub, Ghostlight Coffee, Borrowed Vintage, Omega Music, Sherwood Florist, Wheat Penny Oven and Bar, and C. Marie’s Photography.  

CINCINNATI (AP) - Ohio officials have appealed a federal judge's order to recognize the marriages of gay couples who wed in other states.
 
The state attorney general's office filed a notice of appeal with the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati on Friday.  The state is appealing federal Judge Timothy Black's ruling ordering Ohio to recognize the marriages of same-sex couples that were performed in other states.
 
Most of Black's April 14 ruling was put on hold pending the anticipated appeal.
 

It’s been a big week for advocates of same-sex marriage in Ohio. First, U.S. District Judge Timothy Black issued a ruling Monday that Ohio must recognize same-sex marriages performed in other states. On the same day,  Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine approved new language for a petition to overturn Ohio’s ban on gay marriage, allowing an effort at a voter referendum to move forward.

Ohio gay same-sex marriage equality
Al Behrman / AP

A federal judge has ruled that Ohio will have to recognize same-sex marriages performed in other states, and there are lots of legal implications to recognizing these out-of-state marriages. The ruling concerns birth certificates for the children of four gay couples, but marriage law can also touch on adoption, health care, and, of course, taxes.

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