The state attorney general says Ohioans who lost homes to foreclosure and are eligible claimants under last year's national mortgage settlement will be sent payments during the next week. 

Attorney General Mike DeWine says the checks will be worth about $1,480 for each loan serviced and can help Ohioans facing financial hardship. More than 32,000 loan claims were accepted in Ohio.

Borrowers who lost homes to foreclosure sales between 2008 and 2011 were eligible for payments under the settlement if they met certain requirements. 

Nearly 1 in 4 Ohio mortgages are underwater, according to numbers from real estate data company Zillow Inc. US Senator Sherrod Brown says that’s why he’s introducing legislation to speed up what’s known as short sales.

A new monitor's report released this week shows that more than 7,000 Ohioans have gotten more than $280 million from the national mortgage settlement a year ago.

The report released this week by the Office of Mortgage Settlement Oversight summarizes data provided by the five mortgage servicers involved in the settlement: Ally, Bank of America, Citi, JPMorganChase, and Wells Fargo.

Settlement benefits included loan modifications, forgiveness and deficiency waivers.

Full episode of WYSO Weekend for January 13, 2013 including the following stories:

- Jerry Kenney talks to filmmaker Julia Reichert about ReInvention Stories, a new collaborative series on WYSO and we hear the first story in the series about the Fifth Street Brewpub.

- Emily McCord speaks with Bill Wharton from the public health department for Dayton and Montgomery County about this year's flu outbreak.

County officials in southwest Ohio have filed a class action lawsuit against two mortgage giants they say owe millions in unpaid taxes.

Montgomery County officials filed a federal lawsuit Wednesday that says Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac wrongfully claimed various exemptions to avoid paying transfer taxes to state counties.

Ellen Belcher, who's filling in for Emily McCord, interviews Attorney General Mike DeWine about the $75 million he's awarding to counties in Ohio to tear down the tens of thousands of homes that have been foreclosed on and abandoned.

Montgomery County is eligible for $4 million; Greene County could get $700,000 and Clark County could take in $1 million.

Ellen Belcher, who is filling in for Emily McCord, interviews Jim Rokakis, one of Ohio's top experts on the foreclosure crisis and land banks. In Cuyahoga County and elsewhere across the country, communities are creating land banks to take possession of abandoned properties and to demolish the eyesores. Once a property is cleared, the land bank works to redevelop space that previously was a drag on the neighborhood -- and tax rolls. Montgomery County is in the process of creating its own land bank.

WARRENSVILLE HEIGHTS, Ohio (AP) - A bipartisan group of Ohio and Michigan members of Congress is asking President Barack Obama to help communities in the two states deal with abandoned and vacant homes.

In a letter dated Monday, the 16 lawmakers say stressed local governments need federal support to demolish decaying properties on a large scale.

The letter says weak housing markets in Ohio and Michigan have been devastated by slow population growth. The lawmakers say it's estimated Ohio has more than 70,000 empty homes in such bad shape that they need to be torn down.

Foreclosure Filings Up in Dayton Metro Area

Sep 17, 2010

Foreclosures are on the rise in the Dayton metro area, with Montgomery County having the highest numbers. This comes from the foreclosure filing company, Realty Trac.

Montgomery, Greene and Miami Counties saw a 30 percent increase in foreclosure filings in August from the same time a year ago. Montgomery County had the largest increase from 663 filings in August 2009, to 884 last month. University of Dayton economist Richard Stock says because of recent jobs loss, this doesn't come as a surprise.

From our public forum on Aug. 20, 2009 discussing foreclosure, mortgage problems and struggling neighborhoods.