Farming

Susan Green

In the age of online advertising, some people still use the old-school method to promote stuff they want to buy and sell –– by posting on bulletin boards in laundromats, restaurants and other establishments.

WYSO’s Bulletin Board Diaries brings you some of the stories behind these ads. 

In this installment of the series, a business card found on a bulletin board at a Lebanon restaurant leads producer Jerry Kenney to a horse barn in Franklin, Ohio.

The Miller Dairy Farm in Logan County, just south of Belle Center, Ohio, is a hundred and five acres of rolling green pastures. It’s home to a hundred or so dairy cows and another 200 heifers. They’ve got a few horses, some sheep, a llama and other barnya
Jerry Kenney

The H-2A Temporary Agricultural Workers visa program allows seasonal immigrants to legally work in the United States. Demand for H-2A visa workers is up dramatically nationwide, as many farms have had trouble finding enough employees to fill open jobs.  

wikimedia commons

A coalition made of up mostly smaller family farmers says farmers receive only 19 cents of every dollar Ohioans spend on their Thanksgiving meals this year.

 

Ron Sylvester with the Ohio Farmers Union says figures from the US Department of Agriculture show turkey farmers get 93 cents on every pound of turkey that retails for $1.78 a pound. But other farmers get far less from the products they produce – such as wheat farmers.

 

Jerry Kenney

Cooler temperatures are here and Ohio honeybees are heading indoors—into their hives where they’ll spend the next few months keeping their queens safe and warm.

Corn harvest
United Soybean Board / Flickr/Creative Commons

All of this summer's rain isn't just ruining your outdoor plans—it's taking a toll on Ohio's $100 billion farming industry.

Ohio’s largest industry is taking a big hit thanks to this summer’s wet weather. Ohio Farm Bureau spokesman Joe Cornely says a lot of the state’s corn and soybean crops didn’t get planted in time, and those that did are getting drowned out.

Ohio Getting Over $4M To Fight Toxic Algae In Lake Erie

Mar 30, 2015
Satellite view of toxic algal bloom on Lake Erie
NASA Earth Observatory

The money will come from the federal the Great Lakes Restoration fund and go toward projects in the Maumee River watershed and the Sandusky River watershed in northwestern Ohio.

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency says much of the money will toward preventing phosphorus from getting into the lake and fueling the algae.

Some will be used to fund projects that will take cropland out of production, install field runoff retention systems and restore six miles of stream channels to their natural habitat.

Corn harvest
United Soybean Board / Flickr/Creative Commons

More than 150 farmers gathered in Trotwood Monday evening to share their concerns about taxes with a group of state legislators.

Will Davis / WYSO

Some people are morning people, even on the weekends: They might like, for example, getting up at the crack of dawn on Saturdays to head down to their local farmers’ market. WYSO listener Gabrielle Civil is not one of those people. She lives in Yellow Springs, where the farmers’ market runs from 7 a.m. to 12 p.m. And she had a question about that:

This is WYSO Curious and my question is, why so early? Why is the farmers’ market over by noon?

A chicken farm. Chickens advertised as "cage free" may still be kept in cramped warehouses.
jlastras / Wikimedia Commons

 A California-based lawsuit against Kroger could become a class action including shoppers in Ohio. The dispute is over truth in packaging for Kroger’s line of chicken products known as Simple Truth chicken. Simple Truth is on Kroger shelves in green-themed packaging that says the chicken is cage-free and raised in a humane environment.

Farm Bill Left Hanging in Congress

Oct 2, 2013

Remember the Farm Bill? The omnibus law that funds food stamps, crop insurance, and a slew of farm subsidies? At midnight Monday, a nine-month extension of the latest version of that bill expired, which means for the moment, the law reverts to its 1949 version.

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