Farm Bill

The House of Representatives passed a compromise farm bill Wednesday, which among other provisions will makes some cuts to food stamps. The deal includes $8.6 billion in cuts to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP.

 In a conversation with WYSO's Emily McCord, Senator Sherrod Brown says the bill isn’t perfect, but it’s a lot better than the $40 billion cut Republicans originally wanted and that legislation will grow the agricultural industry.

This week a congressional committee is expected to come out with a compromise on the Farm Bill after months of debate. While the rumor on Capitol Hill is that a compromise has been reached on funding for food assistance, dairy programs remain a source of contention.

Remember the Farm Bill? The omnibus law that funds food stamps, crop insurance, and a slew of farm subsidies? At midnight Monday, a nine-month extension of the latest version of that bill expired, which means for the moment, the law reverts to its 1949 version.

(WYSO/Lewis Wallace)

  U.S. Senator Rob Portman met with farmers in the Dayton area Wednesday to talk about the farm bill. The bill, which is up for renewal, subsidizes both agribusiness and food stamps.

The farmers want a new bill passed soon to protect crop insurance, a federally-subsidized program that helps farmers cope when nature destroys their crops. But Portman recently voted against the Senate version of the omnibus bill.

U.S. Senator Rob Portman will meet with farmers in the Dayton area today to answer questions about the farm bill.

For most farmers, the first concern about the farm bill is making sure there is a farm bill. The bill expires every five years, and the U.S. House and Senate have until October to agree on a new version or extend the old one.

Clark County and many other agricultural areas around the country are bracing themselves for the possibility of major cuts to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP.  The House and Senate voted recently to cut funding for food stamps as part of major changes to the farm bill.

Joel Potts, of the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, says SNAP is important to many families who count on the benefit to put food on the table, particularly in rural, farm areas.