Environment

Winning photo from TLT's 2014 sunflower picture contest.
Tessa Kalman

In celebration of Tecumseh Land Trust’s upcoming 25th anniversary, the regional land preservation organization and WYSO 91.3 FM radio are co-sponsoring an essay contest for area writers to reflect on the meaning of “living on the land.”  To find out more about the contest and a series of workshops coming up, we spoke with Ed Davis - a member of the board of trustees with the land trust.

A Pennsylvania gas well.  fracking drilling
Gerry Dincher / Flickr/Creative Commons

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A new study suggests that fracking triggered hundreds of too-small-to-be-felt earthquakes in eastern Ohio late last year, months before the state first linked seismic activity to the oil-and-gas extraction technique.

The study, in the journal Seismological Research Letters, identified nearly 400 tremors on a previously unmapped fault in Harrison County between Oct. 1 and Dec. 13, 2013. That included 10 quakes of magnitudes of 1.7 to 2.2 — significantly more intense than expected, though still minor.

Emerald Ash Borer Could Have A New Host

Oct 14, 2014
Ryan Somma / Flickr/Creative Commons

A Wright State University researcher has found evidence that the emerald ash borer, a destructive invasive insect, has found a new host—which means ash trees might not be the only trees at risk.

Tech Companies Breaking Up With ALEC Over Climate Change

Oct 13, 2014
A Paulding County wind farm. Ohio Republicans connected to ALEC sponsored a bill to roll back the state's renewable energy standards.
David Grant / Flickr/Creative Commons

Many big tech companies are breaking up with the national organization ALEC, or the American Legislative Exchange Council. ALEC is a group geared towards crafting free-market-based model legislation that’s introduced into state legislatures, usually by conservative Republicans—and Ohio is now caught in the middle of the dispute.

Dayton Citizens' Water Brigade To Hold Teach-In

Oct 4, 2014
Signs around the Miami Valley demarcate the boundaries of the well fields and source water protection areas.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

 A new group called the Dayton Citizens’ Water Brigade is holding a teach-in tonight about the City of Dayton’s water protection policy.

The group opposes changes to the policy that’s been in place for over 25 years. The policy was created as an attempt to keep hazardous chemicals away from the wellfields that supply water to 400,000 people around Dayton, including most Montgomery County suburbs. It forbids new chemicals within a set geographic area, and provides incentives for companies to reduce chemical storage already in place through a buy-back program.

Climate Marchers Return Inspired, New Protests Begin

Sep 23, 2014
Austin Rinebolt-Miller

A group of Antioch College students got back Monday morning from the People’s Climate March in New York City. The march was expected to be the largest and most diverse in history at over 100,000 people. Now organizers are pegging the count at at least 310,000.

Several dozen Antioch students and several hundred Ohioans had planned to attend the march on buses. Antioch students hoped to bring back new energy about fighting global climate change.

LibHedges

On Friday the University of Dayton announced a major gift that will allow them to build on the schools sustainability education.  The $12.5 million dollar gift from the George and Amanda Hanley Foundation is the largest gift the University of Dayton has ever received.  The gift was announced at a ceremony on UD’s campus.

Paul Benson the interim provost at UD says the Hanley Sustainability Institute at UD will prepare students for careers and civic leadership roles that will be in high demand in the future.

The Great Miami River is connected to the Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer, where Dayton gets its water.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The City of Dayton water department says it’s considering feedback from the public and businesses on a proposal to change the city’s drinking water protections.

The city’s water system, which serves 400,000 people including customers in Kettering, Vandalia, Riverside, Trotwood and Brookville, pumps water from two industrial parts of Dayton. Since the late 80s, city zoning laws have limited the hazardous chemicals companies can have in those areas.

Lake Erie Algae Threatens Ohio Drinking Water

Jul 20, 2014

This year the amount of harmful algae forecast for Lake Erie is predicted to be less than last year and considerably less than the record outbreak of 2011. But it’s likely still be significant, coating some parts of the western basin in toxic green slime. Under certain conditions, even moderate blooms can produce levels of harmful toxins that threaten drinking water across the basin.

Our Carbon Dixoide?

Jun 19, 2014
Abby Swann / Flickr Creative Commons

Carbon dioxide in the earth’s atmosphere is at a level that is unprecedented in human experience. University of Dayton professor Bob Brecha explains how we know that we are responsible for the excess CO2.

Carbon dioxide, or CO2 is an important natural part of our atmosphere. Right now, CO2 levels are increasing rapidly. How much of this is part of a natural cycle or is it due to humans?  Scientists know how to answer this question.
 

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