Environment

Algae Treatment at Grand Lake Isn't Working

Oct 15, 2012

A two-year, $8.5 million project to stop toxic algae in Ohio's largest inland lake isn't working.
 
The 13,000-acre Grand Lake St. Marys in western Ohio was sprayed with aluminum sulfate in April that was supposed to keep the blue-green algae from feeding on phosphorous in the water. A similar treatment was applied last year.

The Columbus Dispatch reports that this year's treatment was spoiled by high winds that helped stir phosphorus-rich mud from the lake bottom.

The U.S. Forest Service says the shale drilling technique for natural gas known as hydraulic fracturing can take place in a national forest in southeast Ohio.

The Forest Service released its report Monday after a study of a land and resource management plan drafted in 2006 for the Wayne National Forest.

Forest Supervisor Anne Carey says that plan can adequately address any damage and risks to the forest from the gas extraction method also known as fracking.

She also says a new environmental impact study is not needed.

Named for Rabbit Hash, Kentucky, the hometown of their founder, the Rabbit Hash String Band is a four-piece string and vocal band.  They visited the WYSO studios for a live performance and to chat with Niki Dakota about their music and their namesake community.

Full episode of WYSO Weekend for May 20, 2012 containing the following stories:

-Jerry Kenney interviews Nick Degrassio, a math teacher at Northmont High School, who was first runner up in Heroic Teacher Press' Teacher of the Year award.

-New Ohio Guide: Akron Rubber Industry

-The latest installment of the SOCHE Talks: A River Leadership Curriculum

The controversies generated by climate science in recent years center around the human relationship with the natural world and with natural resources. This month, historian John Brooke puts that critical question in historical perspective—deep historical perspective. For most of human history, our species had to struggle to survive powerful natural forces, like climate and disease. In the past three centuries, however, things have changed dramatically: that struggle has been reshaped by the unprecedented growth of the human population—from under one billion to now over seven.

DrGBB

The National Center for Water Quality Research says the mild winter and spring temperatures could mean toxic blue-green algae will make its appearance in western Lake Erie earlier than usual.

Dr. David Baker says the algae will show up sooner if the water heats up more quickly. Another critical factor will be rainfall and the amount of fertilizer that runs into the lake from nearby farms.

Ellen Belcher, who's filling in for Emily McCord, interviews Jack Shaner, a lobbyist for the Ohio Environmental Council. Shaner talks about Gov. John Kasich's new energy plan and insists that Ohio's "fracking" regulations are woefully weak.

karathepirate

Production of Marcellus Shale natural gas in Pennsylvania rose again in the second half of 2011, slightly
exceeding projections.

The state reported Friday that drillers produced the equivalent of 1.66 billion cubic feet of gas per day from July to December.

That's up from about 1.19 billion cubic feet per day in the previous six months.

That translates into a yearly average of about 1.42 billion cubic feet per day. That's up slightly from previous industry projections of 1.3 billion for 2011.

Lucas County Choppers

The state board that certifies construction plans for new energy facilities has approved an agreement that authorizes a 91-turbine wind farm in north-central Ohio.

The agreement approved Monday by the Ohio Power Siting Board allows Black Fork Wind Energy to construct the farm on 14,800 acres along the Crawford and Richland county line. The board says the company plans to begin construction in March and be operating by December.

Officials say the farm will be capable of generating 200 megawatts of electricity, enough to power tens of thousands of homes.

Јerry

Ohio plans to treat all 13,000 acres of the state's largest inland lake with a chemical to try heading off the toxic algae blooms that become a perennial problem.

Multiple news outlets report that the state's Environmental Protection Agency is trying to pull together $5 million to spread aluminum sulfate, or alum, over Grand Lake St. Mary's in western Ohio.

Officials said in the fall that a test last year over part of the lake was more successful than expected and killed 56 percent of phosphorous in the treated area.

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