Environment

Health, Science & The Environment
7:08 am
Tue August 28, 2012

Ohio National Forest OKs Natural Gas Drilling

The U.S. Forest Service says the shale drilling technique for natural gas known as hydraulic fracturing can take place in a national forest in southeast Ohio.

The Forest Service released its report Monday after a study of a land and resource management plan drafted in 2006 for the Wayne National Forest.

Forest Supervisor Anne Carey says that plan can adequately address any damage and risks to the forest from the gas extraction method also known as fracking.

She also says a new environmental impact study is not needed.

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Music
2:56 pm
Thu August 23, 2012

Rabbit Hash String Band Live on Excursions

The Rabbit Hash String Band

Named for Rabbit Hash, Kentucky, the hometown of their founder, the Rabbit Hash String Band is a four-piece string and vocal band.  They visited the WYSO studios for a live performance and to chat with Niki Dakota about their music and their namesake community.

Around the Miami Valley
10:30 am
Mon May 21, 2012

WYSO Weekend: May 20, 2012

Full episode of WYSO Weekend for May 20, 2012 containing the following stories:

-Jerry Kenney interviews Nick Degrassio, a math teacher at Northmont High School, who was first runner up in Heroic Teacher Press' Teacher of the Year award.

-New Ohio Guide: Akron Rubber Industry

-The latest installment of the SOCHE Talks: A River Leadership Curriculum

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Origins Podcast
10:00 am
Sun April 15, 2012

Climate, Human Population and Human Survival: What the Deep Past Tells Us about the Future

The melting of glaciers due to global warming is threatening fresh water supplies to human populations in a number of regions. Shown here: Canada's Athabasca Glacier.

The controversies generated by climate science in recent years center around the human relationship with the natural world and with natural resources. This month, historian John Brooke puts that critical question in historical perspective—deep historical perspective. For most of human history, our species had to struggle to survive powerful natural forces, like climate and disease. In the past three centuries, however, things have changed dramatically: that struggle has been reshaped by the unprecedented growth of the human population—from under one billion to now over seven.

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Environment
12:13 pm
Tue April 3, 2012

Mild Temps Could Bring Earlier Lake Erie Algae

DrGBB

The National Center for Water Quality Research says the mild winter and spring temperatures could mean toxic blue-green algae will make its appearance in western Lake Erie earlier than usual.

Dr. David Baker says the algae will show up sooner if the water heats up more quickly. Another critical factor will be rainfall and the amount of fertilizer that runs into the lake from nearby farms.

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