Environment

The Great Miami River is connected to the Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer, where Dayton gets its water.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The City of Dayton water department says it’s considering feedback from the public and businesses on a proposal to change the city’s drinking water protections.

The city’s water system, which serves 400,000 people including customers in Kettering, Vandalia, Riverside, Trotwood and Brookville, pumps water from two industrial parts of Dayton. Since the late 80s, city zoning laws have limited the hazardous chemicals companies can have in those areas.

Lake Erie Algae Threatens Ohio Drinking Water

Jul 20, 2014

This year the amount of harmful algae forecast for Lake Erie is predicted to be less than last year and considerably less than the record outbreak of 2011. But it’s likely still be significant, coating some parts of the western basin in toxic green slime. Under certain conditions, even moderate blooms can produce levels of harmful toxins that threaten drinking water across the basin.

Our Carbon Dixoide?

Jun 19, 2014
Abby Swann / Flickr Creative Commons

Carbon dioxide in the earth’s atmosphere is at a level that is unprecedented in human experience. University of Dayton professor Bob Brecha explains how we know that we are responsible for the excess CO2.

Carbon dioxide, or CO2 is an important natural part of our atmosphere. Right now, CO2 levels are increasing rapidly. How much of this is part of a natural cycle or is it due to humans?  Scientists know how to answer this question.
 

The Rumpke Recycling processing plant in Dayton is increasing its capacity with an expensive upgrade.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Rumpke Recycling is close to completing a major upgrade of its Dayton recycling plant this week. Rumpke takes in and processes about 350,000 tons of recycling per year in Cincinnati, Dayton, Columbus and surrounding areas, from residential, commercial and municipal sources.

The Great Miami River is connected to the Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer, where Dayton gets its water.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Scientists around the country are ringing alarm bells about climate change, and some of the effects are already hitting the Dayton area. A local study of attitudes on climate change finds many people are concerned, but it also finds people are not sure what to do about climate change nor confident that it will be addressed.

Freeze On State Energy Standards Closer To Passage

May 8, 2014

A measure to overhaul Ohio’s energy policies is on its way to the House after the state Senate held a vote very early Thursday morning. The bill would freeze the state’s efficiency and renewable standards for two years.

The standards, which have been in place since 2008, require utilities to achieve a certain amount of energy efficiency and use a certain amount of renewable sources by 2025.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The City of Moraine is asking voters to approve a .5 percent increase to its municipal income tax in the Tuesday, May 6 primary election. Moraine City Manager David Hicks says the south Dayton town is in a tough spot financially—and still dealing with empty buildings and polluted superfund sites years after the departure of industry that created it.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

A group of salamanders is recovering at Dayton’s Boonshoft Museum after being removed from the site of an oil spill north of Cincinnati last month. The Mid-Valley pipeline, which is operated by Sunoco Logistics, leaked at least 19,000 gallons of oil into the Oak Glen Nature Preserve. The pipeline runs from Texas to Michigan through Ohio, and WYSO found it’s one of the leakiest in the country.

 

Flickr Creative Commons User linus_art

The Regional Air Pollution Control Agency, or RAPCA, is investigating several instances of elevated levels of PM 2.5, a fine particulate that contributes to air pollution. RAPCA is responsible for monitoring air quality in a six-county area and officials there say several days during the months of December and January registered higher than other places in the region.

"One of the primary sources of fine particulate matter is wood burning," says RAPCA's John Paul. "There's a lot of wood burning in the Yellow Springs area."

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Newly sworn-in Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley was at the U.S. Conference of Mayors Jan. 22-24, and she came back with some insights about what mayors can do to grow jobs and make the most of natural resources.

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