Environment

Future Of Coal Debated In Columbus

Jan 7, 2016
Flickr Creative Commons user Bill Herndon

Who should be paying to keep power plants afloat that are inefficient and don’t do very well in the market—the utility company or its customers?

That's the question under hot debate in Columbus as major utility AEP fights to keep several of its coal plants open through 2030. 

Jerry Kenney

Cooler temperatures are here and Ohio honeybees are heading indoors—into their hives where they’ll spend the next few months keeping their queens safe and warm.

Dayton Power & Light

Continuing their Right Tree, Right Place program this fall, DP&L is reminding residents how important selecting the right tree is when planting close to power lines. 

With both environmental and safety concerns in mind, DP&L says “trees are an important part of the environment that beautify our neighborhoods and communities,” and also says that “trees too close to power lines can become a hazard and contribute to power outages.”

Lake Erie Algae Blooms May Have Peaked For Season

Sep 28, 2015
Satellite view of toxic algal bloom on Lake Erie
NASA Earth Observatory

The algae blooms in Lake Erie around Northeast Ohio may have reached their peak for the season. Heavy spring rains washed large amounts of phosphorous into the lake prompting concerns of serious toxic algae problems.

Laura Johnson, a researcher at the National Center for Water Quality Research at Heidelberg University in northwest Ohio, believes the algae peak has passed, citing shorter days, cooler temperatures and much of the phosphorous in the water being used up.  Johnson says the only thing that could possibly cause the algae blooms to re-generate would be very heavy rain.

Stewart Morris / Flickr Creative Commons

Images of Pope Francis can be found on everything from beer cans to t-shirts leading up to his US visit. But why all the excitement? And what is it about his recent pronouncements on the environment and social justice that have drawn attention from everyone...not just Catholics? University of Dayton Professor Bob Brecha explains with this week’s Climate Commentary.

Columbus Launches Campaign To Plant More Trees In City

Sep 16, 2015
Honavery

The city of Columbus has paired with 20 nonprofits to launch a campaign aimed at bringing more green to Ohio's capital city.
 
The Columbus Dispatch reports "Branch Out Columbus" will plant 300,000 medium-sized trees throughout the city by 2020.
 
Columbus' tree canopy currently covers 22 percent of the city. Mayor Michael Coleman said Tuesday the initiative will grow that number to 27 percent, and that he's shooting for 31 percent.
 

Dayton Water Great Miami River
Texas141

A new report calls for the creation of a $250 million trust to fund water protection in Ohio.

Dayton City Commission Passes Water Protection Changes

Jul 30, 2015
The Dayton City Commission has updated the city's water ordinance.
Wikipedia

The Dayton City Commission has passed a controversial set of changes to the city’s source water protection program.

 

The current code regulates the chemicals around Dayton’s well fields, where most of Montgomery County’s drinking water comes from. Since the late 80s, the zoning code has legislated the amount of potentially hazardous substances that can be stored near the wells. A related regulation, which will remain in place, provides incentives for companies that had chemicals grandfathered in to reduce those chemicals.

 

Activists Renew Concerns About Dayton Water Policy

Jul 22, 2015
Darryl Fairchild (center) appeared at a demonstration outside city hall Wednesday. He is also a candidate for City Commission. water
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Activists are gearing up for another round of debate over the city of Dayton’s source water protection policy.

After more than a year of discussion, a compromise plan will go before the Dayton City Commission next week that would update the policy, which dates back to the late 1980s.

Ryan Von Linden
New York Department of Environmental Conservation

Across the Midwest and eastern U.S., an estimated 6 million bats have died from a devastating scourge that first appeared nine years ago. And while there’s been a recent glimmer of hope in treating bats with White Nose Syndrome, researchers say it’s going to be hard to recover from the damage done to these flying mammals.

Pages