Environment

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

The U.S. EPA is stepping in to help clean up groundwater pollution in the Valley Pike neighborhood of Riverside.

The organization announced yesterday the site has been added to its National Priorities list, which categorizes the most hazardous polluted sites in the country.

The Ohio EPA asked for federal support when the chemicals perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) were found in Valley Pike’s groundwater in 2013. The contaminants were traced back to nearby Mullins Rubber Products.

Miami Township Parks and Recreation

Layer Park in Miami Township has been closed due to ground contamination after the Ohio EPA found high levels of lead in the park’s soil.

The park was the site of a skeet shooting range from the 1930s into the 1950s. Officials believe lead shot became embedded in the ground and contaminated the soil.

The park was already closed for winter and will remain closed until all tests are complete. Residents living nearby were notified of the contamination by the EPA last Friday.

A Pennsylvania gas well.  fracking drilling
Gerry Dincher / Flickr/Creative Commons

State data shows the amount of hydraulic fracturing wastewater pumped underground in Ohio increased by more than 15 percent last year.

The increase comes as drilling for shale in the process known as fracking has slowed nationwide.

A Columbus Dispatch analysis of Ohio Department of Natural Resources numbers shows Ohio took in nearly 29 million barrels of fracking wastewater in 2015.

That figure is about 4 million more barrels than in 2014.

Dayton Water Great Miami River
Texas141

A southwest Ohio wastewater treatment plant has been told it failed to use proper emissions filtering equipment for the second time in less than two years.

The Dayton Daily News reports that federal regulators cited Clean Water Ltd. on Feb. 3 after they say dangerous contaminants from the Dayton facility escaped into the air.

The citation says an emissions filter didn't work properly for nine days last year. A ventilation system didn't function properly for 20 days.

In An Ohio Town, Officials Waited Months To Disclose Dangerous Lead Levels

Jan 29, 2016
bottled Water distribution at the Sebring Community Center in northeast Ohio.
Julie Grant / Allegheny Front

At the community center in tiny Sebring, Ohio, it’s clear there’s something going on. There are trucks from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. People are wearing official-looking fluorescent yellow jackets. The Red Cross is here. And residents are picking up bottled water.

 

The Yellow Springs in winter glen helen
Talitha Green / Glen Helen

Today WYSO Curious takes on a question that’s simple, but also age-old. It involves a feature familiar to Yellow Springs locals: the actual springs after which the town is named.

The springs inside a preserve called Glen Helen look bright yellowish orange where the water comes out. So listener Jonathan Kouse, an occasional visitor to the Glen, asked, “Why are the Yellow Springs yellow?”

 

The Great Miami River is connected to the Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer, where Dayton gets its water.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

  TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) — Ohio's environmental regulators are ordering two wastewater treatment plants in southwest Ohio to reduce the amount of phosphorus that goes into the Great Miami River.

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency last month rejected a request from Dayton and Montgomery County to delay setting the limits.

The state EPA says its research shows the plants are sending too much phosphorus into the river during the summer and that can add up to more toxic algae blooms.

Future Of Coal Debated In Columbus

Jan 7, 2016
Flickr Creative Commons user Bill Herndon

Who should be paying to keep power plants afloat that are inefficient and don’t do very well in the market—the utility company or its customers?

That's the question under hot debate in Columbus as major utility AEP fights to keep several of its coal plants open through 2030. 

Jerry Kenney

Cooler temperatures are here and Ohio honeybees are heading indoors—into their hives where they’ll spend the next few months keeping their queens safe and warm.

Dayton Power & Light

Continuing their Right Tree, Right Place program this fall, DP&L is reminding residents how important selecting the right tree is when planting close to power lines. 

With both environmental and safety concerns in mind, DP&L says “trees are an important part of the environment that beautify our neighborhoods and communities,” and also says that “trees too close to power lines can become a hazard and contribute to power outages.”

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