Environment

An overgrown field was a golf course not long ago.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Since the recession, more than 100 golf courses have closed each year in the U.S., but what happens to all that green? Turns out some golf courses are going even greener: they're getting "re-wilded."

In a dry, overgrown field of thistles and goldenrod, Michael Enright, the conservation manager with Five Rivers MetroParks, explains that not too long ago, this was a trim, manicured golf course called Larch Tree.

“I’ve been to Africa several times and it reminds me of the savannah there when I look out across it,” said Enright.

The Great Miami River is connected to the Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer, where Dayton gets its water.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has finished a one-year study of the Great Miami River Corridor, which looked at opportunities for economic development along a 99-mile stretch. The area studied runs from around Sidney, up in Shelby County, down to the city of Hamilton in Butler County.

Satellite view of toxic algal bloom on Lake Erie
NASA Earth Observatory

Toxic blue-green algae blooms, or cyanobacteria, are a growing problem in Ohio’s lakes, and grabbed the attention of the whole country after the bacteria shut down Toledo’s water system last summer.

Brian Bull / WCPN

 A report from a conservation group names the Lake Erie watershed among the top ten “special places” that need to be protected, but not everyone agrees on what the lake and its tributaries most need to be protected from.

Driving Electric

Dec 29, 2014

“Electricity is the thing ... no whirring and grinding gears …  no water-circulating system to get out of order — no dangerous and evil-smelling gasoline and no noise.”  That’s what Thomas Edison said about electric cars over a century ago.  University of Dayton professor Bob Brecha and some of his colleagues have been taking this to heart.  Here’s Bob with some thoughts on driving electric.

Fracking – Bridge To The Future Or To Nowhere?

Dec 18, 2014
Susy Morris / Flickr Creative Commons

People are happy at the pump these days in Ohio.  Right now gasoline costs well below $3.00 per gallon. Heating with natural gas has gotten cheaper over the past few years.    Both of these trends have to do with fracking.  University of Dayton Professor Bob Brecha has some thoughts about the long-term costs and benefits of going after increasingly difficult fossil fuel deposits.

West Virginia To Allow Fracking Underneath The Ohio River

Dec 9, 2014
erjkprunkczyk / Flickr/Creative Commons

West Virginia is selling hydraulic fracturing or fracking rights under the Ohio River, and the effects of that decision will be monitored by the other states in the Ohio River Valley.

About 50 Quaker protesters showed at two PNC bank branches in Springfield Saturday.
Wayne Baker / WYSO

Several local Quaker activists participated in a “Flood PNC” protest in Springfield Saturday morning. The Earth Quaker Action Team organized demonstrations in 12 states and the District of Columbia to ask PNC Bank to stop financing mountaintop removal coal mining in Appalachian areas.

The U.S. EPA says the process involves mining companies blowing the tops off of mountains in order to extract an abundance of coal. After the coal is extracted, toxic waste is often dumped into the environment, harming water supplies and wildlife.

Coolstock

Ohio officials have ordered that all deer at a private hunting preserve in Holmes County be killed because the owner didn't follow quarantine rules after one tested positive for a rare disease.

It was the first time chronic wasting disease was found in Ohio. No cases have been found in wild deer in the state, but officials are taking extra precautions during the ongoing gun hunting season for deer to ensure the disease doesn't spread.

courtesy of Antioch College

On October 25, 2014, Nick Boutis, Executive Director of the Glen Helen Ecology Institute at Antioch College delivered the following keynote address the University of Dayton's Sustainability Summit.

The gist of what I’m going to tell you over the next few minutes is that, when life gives you lemons, make a lemon meringue pie. Lemonade is fine, and all, but sometimes new challenges call for new solutions.

In the fall of 2011, after a three-year closure that many assumed was permanent, Antioch College reopened its doors to students.

Why?

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