Energy

On Monday, Governor John Kasich issued a ‘statewide energy emergency’ to deal with slowdowns in propane deliveries. Weather conditions and other factors are causing problems for fuel suppliers and their customers, and the governor’s declaration will allow propane and heating oil transporters to drive for more hours and more consecutive days than current regulations permit.

Propane production is actually up in the U.S. over the last five years, so the problem isn’t a shortage, it’s getting the gas to where it’s needed. 

liftarn / Openclipart

The state of Ohio has been investigating its competitive energy market for a year now, and the state reports electric competition is growing, which means more options for consumers.

Energy choice itself doesn’t look like much: the lights go on, the lights go off, and you pay your monthly bill the same way. But in the past, a utility company—the name that’s on most people’s electric bills—also owned the actual power plant. Electric choice, which was passed in Ohio over ten years ago, is gradually moving the market away from that system.

Wright-Patterson Air Force Base is expected to privatize more energy and utility operations as it tries to offset steep cuts in the federal defense budget.

The base has already asked for bids to privately manage two water plants on the base that pump more than three millions of gallons a day out of an underground aquifer.

Base spokesman Daryl Mayer tells the Dayton Daily News that the Defense Logistics Agency also has asked for bids to maintain the base infrastructure for waste water collection and natural gas distribution at the state's largest single-site employer.

 Voters passed electric aggregation in Xenia Tuesday by a margin of around 9 percent, and Dayton's ballot issue squeezed through with just a .51 percent margin in favor.

Montgomery County Board of Elections Director Jan Kelly says a final count will be complete Nov. 26, and official results including any recounts will be issued Dec. 6. Because the Dayton's aggregation proposal won by just 75 votes in the "official unofficial" tally (7,318 in favor and 7,243 against), it's still possible the final count could go the other way.

bravebug / Openclipart

City of Dayton residents will vote Tuesday on whether to allow electric aggregation. If passed, the ballot issue would allow the city to choose who supplies electricity to Dayton residents—a move the city says will save people money.

A Miami Valley is making a big push into solar energy.

Construction should start this month at Cedarville University for a solar array of more than 2,000 kilowatts. Power should flow in April.

The school says the energy will be enough for 250 homes, besides bringing the environmental benefits of using solar power.

The Dayton Daily News reports that Cedarville has made solar technology part of its curriculum for years. The Christian-based school has some 3,400 students.
 
   
 

Environmental activists and consumer advocates are breathing a sigh of relief. Ohio lawmakers apparently are NOT going to change the state’s energy efficiency program during the last days of the current legislative session.

The program requires electric companies to lower overall power usage by giving money to people and businesses that buy energy-saving appliances and equipment. To fund the program, all electricity customers pay a surcharge on their monthly electric bills.

Ohio officials say more than 200,000 residents around the state are still without power days after two weekend thunderstorms left many in the dark.

The Ohio Emergency Management Agency released new figures Wednesday afternoon that add several thousand customers from Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives to the tally.  The bulk of the outages still belong to customers of American Electric Power.

Dayton Power & Light is reporting just a handful of outages in the listening area now and plan to have it all back online by this evening.

Operators of a nuclear plant in Ohio say they've discovered and contained a pinhole-size leak spraying radioactive coolant at the plant.

Nuclear regulators and plant operators say the leaking coolant at the Davis-Besse nuclear plant near Toledo never got outside the building and posed no threat to the public.

Workers discovered the leak Wednesday as they were getting ready to restart the plant after a month-long maintenance shut down.

Full episode of WYSO Weekend for April 22, 2012 containing the following stories:

-Jerry Kenney speaks with Jean Howat Berry about Cityfolk's Culture Builds Community culmination performance, Soul Rhythms.

-Jerry Kenney speaks with Alan Shaffer about the Dayton Progress Manufacturing Challenge scholarship program for area high school students.

-The latest installment of the SOCHE Talks: Why We Need a Renewable Energy Revolution

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