Elections

The organization that represents elections officials throughout Ohio has not taken a position on the federal court’s most recent ruling on changes to the state’s elections laws. Last week the court ordered the state to go back to some of the early voting options that were in place in 2010, but have since been eliminated by new laws. Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted plans to appeal the ruling, but Aaron Oeckerman with the Ohio Association of Election Officials says his group didn’t ask Husted to do that.

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School levies are among the biggest issues on the ballot in the upcoming November 5, 2013 election. Ohio schools depend on these levies as an essential funding stream, and many are facing new or additional levies that can be difficult to pass.

Money for Ohio’s public schools comes from three sources: federal funds, state funds, and local tax levies.

“Levies then become the source really of their chief operating funds,” explains Mark Smith of Cedarville University. “For most cases those local schools are very dependent upon those local property taxes.”

The results from Tuesday’s special election in Ohio are still unofficial as provisional and absentee ballots continue to be counted, and though it varies from precinct to precinct, and county to county, voter turnout overall was expectedly low.

Voters in 23 Ohio counties decided on 28 issues. 19 of those were school tax levies. But no matter if an issue passed or failed, it was still decided on by a reletively few number of people who had the ability to participate in the decision making process.

The Ohio Secretary of State has made changes to the office’s website designed to make it easier for Ohio voters to update and check on their voting status. In an interview with Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles, Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted talks about the upgrades to the office’s internet site.

Ohio's elections chief has sided with fellow members of the Republican party in breaking a tie vote over counting ballots in a disputed 2010 juvenile court election.

Secretary of State Jon Husted on Tuesday agreed that the Hamilton County Board of Elections in southwest Ohio should appeal a Feb. 8 court order requiring it to count hundreds of provisional ballots.

The Republican in the race holds a 23-vote lead over the Democrat, and the board's Democrats want the disputed votes tallied. The board's two Republicans say the ballots aren't eligible.

There’s a problem commonly known as right church, wrong pew.  It’s when a voter goes to the right polling place but ends up casting a ballot in the wrong precinct. 

Up to date results from the New Hampshire Primary on January 10, 2011

 

 

Ohioans can cast an early ballot for the Nov. 8 election starting Tuesday. 

Voters this fall will decide whether the state should toss out a law governing public employee unions that was passed this spring. The measure limits the collective bargaining abilities of more than 350,000 teachers, nurses, firefighters, police and other public workers around the state.

Another question facing voters is whether the state's constitution should be amended to prohibit governments from requiring Ohioans to buy health insurance.

Secretary of State Jon Husted says a new law should make it easier for all of Ohio’s military members serving abroad to cast ballots.  Under this new law, Husted says military members will receive a kit that gives them all of the information they need to vote in Ohio.  And he’s established a website, OhioMilitaryVote.com, that will provide those who serve the country abroad with the same information in the kit. Husted says this new process will make sure military members can get a ballot on the internet.

COLUMBUS, Ohio - Groups in Ohio say the outcome of Wisconsin recall elections involving a collective bargaining overhaul will have little bearing on whether a similar law in Ohio is repealed this fall.

We Are Ohio spokeswoman Melissa Fazekas said Tuesday that the scenarios in the two states aren’t comparable.

In Wisconsin, Republican politicians who signed onto the law are being challenged. In Ohio, voters will decide Nov. 8 whether to keep the law that limits public unions. Ohio's constitution makes no provision for recalling elected officials.

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