Election 2014

Preliminary results are in from school levies on the May 6 ballot across the Miami Valley and in a low turn-out primary election, just a handful of people made some of these decisions.

John Boehner
Gage Skidmore / Flickr/Creative Commons

House Speaker John Boehner beat two tea party challengers in the GOP primary last night. Now, he’ll face a college professor this fall in his bid for a 13th term in Congress.

In the Democratic primary, Miami University professor Tom Poetter defeated restaurant supervisor Matthew Guyette for the right to challenge Boehner in Ohio's 8th Congressional District.

Election Results: May 6, 2014

May 6, 2014
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General election highlights (to be updated):

mayor nan whaley
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Dayton voters will be asked to renew a .5 percent increase to the city’s income tax on Tuesday’s primary ballot.

Dayton’s income tax is currently 2.25 percent, but the permanent rate is 1.75 percent—the last half a percent has always been temporary. Voters have renewed it overwhelmingly four times since it was first passed in 1984.

City officials hope to cut the costs of bringing the tax to a vote in the future by asking voters to pass the increase with no time limit.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The City of Moraine is asking voters to approve a .5 percent increase to its municipal income tax in the Tuesday, May 6 primary election. Moraine City Manager David Hicks says the south Dayton town is in a tough spot financially—and still dealing with empty buildings and polluted superfund sites years after the departure of industry that created it.

A photo of a 1927 advertisement for the city of Moraine posted in city hall; in addition to being an early industrial site in Dayton, David Hicks says it was considered a riverside getaway for Dayton residents.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The city of Moraine has an income tax levy coming up on the May 6, 2014 ballot that would increase the tax from 2 percent to 2.5 percent for a period of five and a half years. The city’s revenue, which has always depended on an income tax, has been in a steep decline since at least the year 2000, as many large employers left the south Dayton suburb.

The lack of student interest and older residents unable to work the polls has created a shortage of workers.  Hundreds of positions need to be filled before the May 6th primary.

It takes 584 poll workers to get the job done in Greene County and right now the search is on to fill about 200 of those slots. Warren County needs nearly 150 more workers.

The problem in Montgomery County is even bigger.

Ohioans will vote on primary races for statewide offices, including Governor, as well as a statewide ballot issue that would allow the state to issue bonds for some capital improvements. There are more than 600 local issues on the ballot too.

On April first, election boards will start to mail out absentee ballots to those who have requested them, or Ohioans who want to vote early, in person, can vote at the early voting center designated by their county board of elections. 

Republican Governor John Kasich released his Mid-Biennium Review this week, a policy document that updates his previous budget and lays the framework for his administration's agenda for the upcoming year. The proposal includes plans for workforce development, education and veterans' issues. Ohio Public Radio's Karen Kasler tells Emily McCord that Kasich's tax cuts are generating the most scrutiny from Republicans and Democrats alike as the governor faces re-election in the fall.

Key highlights of Kasich's tax proposal in the MBR:

Huber Heights has seen tax revenues decline since the Recession.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Huber Heights has announced plans to seek an income tax increase on the November 2014 ballot; the city is predicting budget shortfalls of $2.3 million per year.

“We’ve been using reserves for the past five or six years to provide the services we have out there today, and we’ve come to a crossroads,” says Scott Falkowski, Huber Heights Assistant City Manager.

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