Election 2014

Juliet Fromholt

Around the state, on the campaign trail and through the halls of the Statehouse, young Ohioans are playing a major role in their communities. The Millennial Generation is now the biggest demographic in America, even outnumbering Baby Boomers. Those born between 1980 and 2000 are becoming a bigger part of Ohio’s policymaking and election process.

Harry Bossey, who owns an export business in Miamisburg, is running for the second time as a Republican against Democratic Montgomery County Auditor Karl Keith.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Many Miami Valley voters will be asked to choose a county auditor on the ballot on Tuesday—but some might not be clear on why the office matters.

kristen_a / Flickr Creative Commons

Abortion is likely the first thing that comes to many people’s minds when they hear the words, women’s issues. But that’s only one issue women are concerned about. In fact, there are other issues that many women say are more significant to them. Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports on what those women want and how they are going about the process of getting it.

Both Democrats and Republicans have launched major voter turnout efforts in advance of the November 2014 election.  vote election voters
elycefeliz / Flickr/Creative Commons

Both major political parties are in the last-ditch push to get their voters to return early ballots or to turn out on Election Day Nov. 4.

Matt Borges, chair of the Ohio Republican Party, says the party learned a lot from losing the races for president and U.S. Senator in 2012.

Measuring Ohio’s Economic Changes Under Gov. John Kasich

Oct 31, 2014
Zack McCarthy / Flickr

Ohio Gov. John Kasich is running a relatively low-profile reelection campaign. He’s not debating on TV. Instead, he’s betting his record on the economy will bring in the votes he needs.

When making his case for reelection, Kasich will point to the big headline numbers in Ohio’s jobs story, as he did in an interview with Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler.

Governor John Kasich made a campaign stop in Beavercreek Tuesday.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

There aren’t many undecided voters in this election, especially when it comes to the candidates for governor, but that doesn’t mean all voters are happy with the options they have.

The polls haven’t been good to Democratic candidate for governor Ed FitzGerald. He’s trailing Republican incumbent John Kasich in overall likely voters, and in the latest Quinnipiac poll, 16 percent of Democrats say they have an unfavorable opinion of him, along with 44 percent of Republicans.

As election day draws closer, several Clark County races have heated up. The race for a seat as a Clark County commissioner between incumbent Republican Rick Lohnes, who is one of two GOP members on the three person commission, and attorney David Herier, a Democrat, is one to watch closely, according to political analyst Rob Baker of Wittenberg University.

Seven State School Board Seats In Play This Election

Oct 29, 2014
Wirawat Lian-udom / Flickr Creative Commons

If you're following politics this year you probably know most of the candidates on the ballot for statewide offices, your congressional district, and maybe a few local seats. But do you know who is running for state school board? Candidates in seven board districts are vying for votes this election. The board exerts considerable influence over education policy, and it just might be worth giving the candidates a look before heading to the polls on Election Day.

Dan Foley - Twitter

Three people are vying for a seat as Montgomery County Commissioner in the election November 4th. The incumbent, Democratic Commissioner Dan Foley, will face off against former Dayton Mayor, independent Gary Leitzell, and Republican Mike Nolan.  

Commissioner Foley says the last eight years have been tough on the Miami Valley, but things are getting better.

“You know, while nobody’s walking down the street giving high-fives to each other yet, we are clearly starting to fight back and I’ve played a part in that," he says.

Some Clark County voters will be casting their ballots at new locations this election day after the Clark County Board of Elections changed several polling locations to accommodate people with disabilities.

Election board members had to find new locations after the Ohio Secretary of State’s Office conducted a preliminary voting inspection and found that nearly a dozen polling places failed to meet accessibility requirements for people with disabilities.

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