Education

tncountryfan / Flickr/Creative Commons

Nearly nine out of ten Ohio third graders have passed the state’s third grade reading test, which allows them to move on to fourth grade—but Dayton scored among the worst in the state.

Eighty-eight percent of the 110,000 kids who took the test statewide passed this spring. That’s up from a little over 63 percent who passed the test in the fall.

Ohio’s Democratic Candidate for Governor is calling on Republican Governor John Kasich to halt the third grade guarantee. He also wants more money for public education.

Cuyahoga County Executive Ed FitzGerald told members of the state’s largest teachers union that there are things state leaders need to do to help public education be successful in Ohio.

Michael Kellen

A local group has asked Dayton public schools for a moratorium on out of school suspensions. Racial Justice now presented their request at a school board meeting last night.  

According to the group, Black students accounted for 80% of school suspensions in 2011.

Professor Vernellia Randall with the University of Dayton is co-founder of Racial Justice now. She says removing students from the school system for non-violent offenses sets up an unfavorable pattern..

School districts throughout the Miami Valley are working under different rules when it comes to making up snow days.
Flickr Creative Commons User Christina's Play Place

The Ohio House has held off taking a formal vote on a plan to let schools take up to four additional days off this year because of the season's extreme weather.

At issue is a disagreement over how many days to allow. House Speaker Bill Batchelder says members plan to take an additional week to continue to work on the number of days in the proposal and review its costs.

mayor nan whaley
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley kept her focus on jobs and education at her first State of the City speech Tuesday.

In honor of the 50th anniversary of the Beatles coming to the U.S., Mayor Whaley started by channeling the Fab Four to sum up the state of the city.

“I could try to convince you that everything in Dayton is 'ob-la-di, ob-la-da' if we could just ‘let it be,’” she said. “But my commission colleagues would probably tell me—you can’t do that.”

Columbus school officials say they are taking steps to fire four principals who the district says were associated with student record-keeping problems.

Superintendent Dan Good made the announcement Tuesday. It came on the heels of the Ohio auditor's investigation into attendance data scrubbing at the state's largest school district.

Good says letters sent Tuesday tell the four principals that they are being placed on unpaid leave and recommended for termination.

Republican state Reps. Tony Burkley and Brian Hill have introduced a plan to add four calamity days this year following a call from Gov. Kasich  who said many schools have exhausted their five allowable days off for snow or bad weather, or soon will. 

John Charlton at the Ohio Department of Education explains the Governor thinks many schools are going to exhaust the five calamity days now currently allowed by law. And Charlton says the hope is the extra calamity days will make it safer for school children.

School bus
schoolfreeware / Openclipart

The Beavercreek City School Board will hold its first regular meeting Thursday since a dramatic levy recount in November. The levy passed, but the vote was so close it wasn’t made official until December. In the final count, the $10 million five-year levy squeaked through with a 33-vote advantage.

Time for a spending blitz? Not so fast.

Adrien Facélina

A Dayton education initiative called Learn to Earn has been selected for a national partnership. The Lumina Foundation is giving 20 cities up to $200,000 for the project. It's part of an effort to prepare the region for the high paying jobs of the future.

More international students are going to college in Ohio.

A new report finds that international students studying at Ohio colleges increased 7.5 percent - to more than 28,000 - for the 2012-13 school year.

The report released Monday by the Institute of International Education puts Ohio at No. 8 nationally.

The Columbus Dispatch reports that the leading country of origin for foreign students in Ohio was China, which provided 41 percent of all international students. India and Saudi Arabia were next.

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