Education

How the State Budget Affects Education

Jul 11, 2013

The state budget Governor Kasich signed last week puts more than 19 billion dollars of state funding into Ohio schools. State GOP leaders are calling it a historic investment in education.

Overall, most schools will see more money from the state than they did last year, nearly $1 billion more. But not every district will get more money—about a third of districts won’t see any increase. And even this new money will not make up for the deep cuts in state funding for schools in 2009.

New Ohio Law Gets Rid of Snow Days

Jul 10, 2013

A new law changes gets rid of snow days for Ohio schools. The change also replaces the minimum number of days in a school year and will instead count hours, depending on grade level.

The Dayton Daily News reports the change will begin with the 2014-2015 school year. Lawmakers say this will give schools more flexibility to make up snow days by adding hours rather than tacking on days to the end of the year.

The Ohio Department of Education says the state is redirecting $19 million to help school districts offset federal budget cuts.

Ohio Superintendent Richard Ross announced Monday that $11 million in unused federal funds will go for special education and another $8 million for Title 1 math and reading intervention programs. The money is coming from untapped special project funds and money that had been awarded to now-closed charter schools.

Miami University Makes Strides Toward Acceptance of Gay Students

Jun 25, 2013

Students and alumni say that Miami University has created a climate of acceptance for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer students, despite the school’s longstanding conservative reputation and location in a deeply conservative part of the state.

A left leaning think tank says the proposed two year state budget would help private and charter schools but would hurt public schools.

Innovation Ohio’s Dale Butland says public schools are the big losers in the Republican backed budget plan that’s on the table right now.

"Most of them will get less money than they did in the 2010-11 budget and about 25% of our schools will get less than they did in the 2012-13 budget," says Butland.

The June 2013 installment of SOCHE TALKS features Mark Roosevelt, president of  Antioch College on creating change agents through the liberal arts.

The SOCHE Talks are a collaboration with the Southwest Ohio Council for Higher Education. In this monthly series we’ll hear from faculty and staff from areas colleges and universities on a wide variety of subjects. It's an effort to bring Miami Valley research and thinking into the public arena – a way to enlighten the world with local knowledge.

There’s a bill in the Ohio legislature that would give public school students credit for taking religious classes. The legislation is drawing criticism from people who worry about unintended consequences of it.

Democratic State Representative Bill Patmon says it’s time for public schools to encourage students to take part in religious instruction.

"It’s an attempt on our side to give exposure to God and religious which seemingly has been completely exorcised from our schools," says Patmon.

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine is ready to announce the recommendations of a committee formed to evaluate school safety in the wake of last year's school shootings in Connecticut and in Chardon in northeast Ohio.

The task force includes educators and police and fire officials ordered to review ways to improve school safety plans.

The plans are schools' responses to a variety of emergencies, from active shooters to fires, accidents, severe weather or medical emergencies.

Majority Republicans in the Ohio Senate say their state budget education proposal spreads more money to more school districts.

Senate President Keith Faber says the plan increases state aid to schools in the two-year budget by more than $717 million compared to the current budget, which ends June 30.

Faber said Thursday the money stems from expected adjustments to state revenue and Medicaid caseload projections.

The GOP-controlled Senate's proposal spends almost $142 million more to fund schools compared to the House-passed version of the spending bill.

Some parents and a civil rights group oppose policies to insert creationism and other religious issues into a western Ohio school district's classrooms.

The Dayton Daily News reports the Springboro School Board took comments on the proposed policy changes at a meeting Thursday night attended by parents, students and teachers.

The American Civil Liberties Union sent a letter Thursday to the board urging members to abandon the plan to list to add creationism and evolution as discussion issues appropriate for students.

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