Education

The number of low-income children in Head Start's preschool programs in Ohio will drop by more than 1,800 during this school year because of automatic federal spending cuts.

The Office of Head Start says those cuts will reduce its preschool ranks by more than 57,000 children nationwide. More than a million children are served each year by the programs, which help prepare them for elementary school and give them meals and health care.

The August 2013 installment of SOCHE TALKS features Dr. Joseph Watras with the University of Dayton's School of Education and Allied Professions speaking on the history of racial desegregation in Dayton schools.

The SOCHE Talks are a collaboration with the Southwest Ohio Council for Higher Education. In this monthly series we’ll hear from faculty and staff from areas colleges and universities on a wide variety of subjects. It's an effort to bring Miami Valley research and thinking into the public arena – a way to enlighten the world with local knowledge.

Beating The Odds

Aug 15, 2013

In the Chicago public schools, and urban school districts across the nation, if you’re a black male the odds are against your going on to college. If you do, there’s a good chance you won’t complete your degree. The college graduation rate for African American males who graduate from Chicago Public Schools is a little more than 20 percent.  WYSO Community Voices Producer Amy Harper takes a look at the forces affecting the life of one young man who is trying to beat the odds.  

Ohio's higher education chief says illegal immigrants with temporary legal status will soon be able to pay in-state tuition rates at the state's public colleges as long as they meet other residency requirements.

Most of the state's two- and four-year public colleges have previously charged students who are illegal immigrants tuition rates much higher than what other Ohio students pay.

The Columbus Dispatch reports that John Carey, chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents, sent a letter Wednesday to the state's college presidents notifying them of the changes.

Wright State University

Chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents, John Carey, was at Wright State University on Monday for the final stop on a statewide tour to highlight the recent state budget and its impact on higher education.

Carey, a former state representative appointed to the Board of Regents in April, said the mission mandated to him by Governor John Kasich is to align Ohio educational institutions with workforce development.

New Common Core Academic Standards Face Opposition

Jul 26, 2013

Some Ohio legislators are making a late play to block implementation of new math and English standards that schools are required to phase in starting this school year. The so-called Common Core is a set of national expectations for students that Ohio’s state Board of Education adopted three years ago. There was little opposition at the time but that’s changing.

These new standards aim to better prepare students for college and jobs, so they are tougher than Ohio’s current standards.

The July 2013 installment of SOCHE TALKS features Wittenberg University's Tammy Proctor on the myth of the female spy.

The SOCHE Talks are a collaboration with the Southwest Ohio Council for Higher Education. In this monthly series we’ll hear from faculty and staff from areas colleges and universities on a wide variety of subjects. It's an effort to bring Miami Valley research and thinking into the public arena – a way to enlighten the world with local knowledge.

A southwest Ohio man who unfurled a Confederate battle flag at a school board meeting says he was trying to make a point about history. Others say his move was offensive.

The Cincinnati Enquirer reports that Sonny Thomas says his message was misinterpreted. He showed the flag at a recent Springboro board of education meeting in response to it backing off an earlier plan to offer a constitutional class with a religious theme. He says the flag means heritage to many people in the South and that he meant to educate and inform.

Ohio’s Former Chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents is taking a new job. Eric Fingerhut has been named the President and CEO of the Hillel Foundation, an organization that helps Jewish college aged students. Fingerhut says he’s excited about this new possibility.

"I feel so blessed to have this opportunity to bring together the two passions of my life – education and my connection to the Jewish world," says Fingerhut.  Nothing would make me happier than for this to be the job that  spend the rest of my professional career in and make a difference everyday."

A state lawmaker in Ohio wants to provide a tax break to property owners who home-school their children.

The proposal comes from state Sen. Kris Jordan of Ostrander in central Ohio.

His bill would reduce property taxes for parents who home-school their children by an amount equal to what they pay for school levies in their local districts.

According to The Plain Dealer, Jordan says the legislation will help those who sacrifice to home-school a child.

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