Education

A judge has ruled a takeover of the Youngstown City Schools by an appointed chief executive officer can proceed.

In denying a preliminary injunction Tuesday, Judge Jenifer French delivered a blow to representatives of the academically-distressed district who sought to block implementation of the law this month.

The takeover plan was crafted by a group of local business, community and education leaders with the help of State Superintendent Richard Ross. It was kept secret from the public until it was pushed through both chambers of the state Legislature on a single day.

Bing Davis and Margaret Peters
StoryCorps

Friday, in hundreds of schools across the nation, prominent African Americans will go back to schools in their local communities to talk to students about their experiences. It’s part of the 6th Annual Back to School With The HistoryMakers program.

Dayton Artist Willis “Bing” Davis has spent a great deal of his life educating children and young adults about the importance of the arts and Friday he’ll talk to Belmont High School students about this year’s HistoryMakers theme: Commitment

Critics React To New Charter School Details

Sep 7, 2015
Superintendent of Public Instruction Richard Ross with Gov. John Kasich at a Cleveland charter school earlier this year.
Mark Urycki / State Impact Ohio

Critics are reacting to details buried in more than 100,000 documents related to the Ohio Department of Education’s handling of charter schools.

The state’s head of school choice, David Hansen, resigned after admitting to leaving out failing grades of online and dropout recovery schools while evaluating charter school sponsors. And reviews of public records released by the department suggest that several employees knew, on some level, about the data-rigging, but not state school superintendent Richard Ross.

Study Says Students' Race Changes Teacher Expectations

Aug 25, 2015
Arise Academy in Dayton is now closed, and former leaders of the school have been convicted of federal crimes.
User: Paradox 56 / Flickr/Creative Commons

Race does matter, according to a new study measuring high school teachers’ expectations for black students.

A new study involving 16,000 high school teachers around the country finds black teachers are more optimistic about black students than white teachers are. Researchers at American University and Johns Hopkins would pick a 10th grader and then ask two of his teachers, one white and one black, about how far they thought the student would go in school.

Deconstructing Race: Remembering Segregated Schools

Aug 24, 2015

Race is definitely a social construct that is designed to benefit some to the detriment of others—in the case of America, it benefits whites to the detriment of Blacks.

My father's people were very dark and my mother's people were white. We as children were various shades of brown. I never understood why my grandmother said she was colored, and had to tolerate the indignities of racism.

colored penciles, education, art
Alan Cleaver / Flickr Creative Commons

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Ohio's public school superintendent has named a three-member panel to advise the department on evaluating charter school sponsors.

Superintendent Richard Ross says the state is committed to creating a system that evaluates charter school sponsors fairly while adhering to complex legal requirements. He says the independent panel will help do that.

Jeff Hiles / WYSO

College students are surrounded by technology inside and outside of the classroom. And increasingly educators are reaching learners through smart phones and laptops.

Ron Solada / WYSO

College Promise provides a free college education for academically gifted children from poverty impacted families here in Montgomery County. The initiative started 4 years ago and now has over 250 children selected from area middle schools on the path to a free college education, starting at Sinclair Community College and finishing at schools like Miami University, Wright State University and University of Dayton.

Barley / Flickr Creative Commons

Several universities and other institutions around the country have made headlines in the past year or two by deciding to eliminate all investments in fossil fuels.  Is this action a serious step toward mitigating the effects of climate change, or just a public relations ploy?  University of Dayton professor Bob Brecha has more during this week’s climate commentary.

Library books
Dan Goldblatt, WFIU Public Radio / Flickr/Creative Commons

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The number of school librarians in Ohio has dropped by nearly half in the past 10 years despite studies showing students do better when those jobs are filled.

Ohio Department of Education data shows 923 school librarians in the 2013-2014 school year, down 43 percent from 1,628 in the 2004-05 school year.

Pages