Education

Ohio Department Of Education Calls For Reduced Testing

Jan 16, 2015
Pete "comedy_nose" / Flickr

The Ohio Department of Education has released a report recommending a cutback in the amount of time spent testing students, which currently averages 20 hours per school year.

The department wants state lawmakers to reduce testing and practice time by 20 percent, eliminate the fall 3rd grade standardized reading test except for students who need them, and eliminate math and science diagnostic tests in the first three grades.

Ohio’s own teacher evaluations add time as well, because students are tested to show how much they learned over a year.  

Paradox 56 / Flickr Creative Commons

A prosecutor says the former Columbus city schools superintendent will be charged with dereliction of duty in connection with the district's attendance data-scrubbing scandal.
 
Franklin County Prosecutor Ron O'Brien said he plans to file the charge later Monday and confirms that ex-superintendent Gene Harris will enter a no contest plea.
 
The Columbus Dispatch, which first reported the deal Monday, says Harris is expected to enter her no contest plea in court Wednesday.
 

School districts throughout the Miami Valley are working under different rules when it comes to making up snow days.
Flickr Creative Commons User Christina's Play Place

The recent weather has forced many school closures and delays. But the rules for how school districts will make up the missed days vary.

All of the nearly 40 public school districts throughout the Miami Valley were closed Tuesday. Most remained closed Wednesday and Thursday as well because of frigid temperatures. This is the second time schools have kept kids at home this winter.

State Pushes For New School Safety Plans

Dec 30, 2014
The Ohio Department of Education is pushing for updated safety plans for schools around the state.
Ohio Department of Education

The start of the new year brings a new requirement for schools.

Starting Jan. 1 — Ohio schools must create a new safety plan. Administrators have been making these plans for a few years now but the updated versions must follow new parameters laid out by the state. 

As John Charlton with the Ohio Department of Education explains, this creates a better standard compared to previous plans.

Organizations are grumbling about a requirement from the Ohio Department of Education to include a faith-based group for a mentorship program.
ohio.gov

The state’s leading civil rights organization is planning a public records request to find out more about a state-supported mentoring program for schools. 

Ohio Superintendent of Public Instruction Richard Ross, who is an appointee of Gov. John Kasich, says schools that want to join the Community Connections program can partner with a business or a non-profit. But must also have a faith-based organization on board.

Wayne Baker

Ohio's new Bureau of Criminal Investigation Science School was launched this week in Springfield with 4th graders  at Perrin Woods Elementary School. Wednesday, Attorney General Mike DeWine visited the school to check on the program's progress.

On Monday, kids at the elementary school were the first in the state to start participating in the program, which was created by the Attorney General's office in order to expose younger students to science.

knowyourcharters.com

A new study by an Ohio education watchdog group says local tax revenue is essentially subsidizing charter schools, which are non-traditional schools that are often run by outside groups.
 

Senior students at the Dayton Regional STEM School at work on the Living Lens Project - a partnership with the Newport Aquarium's Wave Foundation.
Jerry Kenney/WYSO

This school year, students at the Dayton Regional STEM School teamed up with the Newport Aquarium's Wave Foundation to create short documentaries and a website featuring four different species who make their home at the aquarium. To get details about the program and its impact, We spoke with STEM senior Tess Greene—the executive producer of the Living Lens Project.

Race in the Classroom: Teaching Civil Rights

Dec 13, 2014

Join hosts Leticia Wiggins and Patrick Potyondy in a conversation with historians—and award-winning teachers—Kevin Boyle, Stephanie Shaw, and Hassan Kwame Jeffries about the importance and difficulties of teaching race and civil rights in the classroom.

Jerry Kenney/WYSO

On Wednesday, December 10th, in schools across Dayton, Men of Color are going back to school. The day-long program is designed to provide black students with positive role models.

“Men of Color Go Back To School” is about taking the problems facing young black males head on says City Commissioner Jeffrey Mims.

"They’re leading the pack when it comes to suspensions, being put into special education, incarceration and unfortunately some of these untimely negative situations of violence and death," he adds.

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