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Education

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Trustees at a small university in Ohio have approved allowing faculty and staff with permits to carry concealed weapons on campus.

Cedarville University will become the first college in Ohio to allow concealed weapons on campus.

The Dayton Daily News reports reports the new policy announced will take effect in August.

A new Ohio law allows individual boards of trustees to decide whether to allow concealed weapons on campus.

Dayton Public Schools is hosting a series of town hall meetings this month, in part to offer solutions to ongoing problems with district transportation. The first event is scheduled for May 10th.

  In a statement, the district said the meetings are being held to discuss “new academic offerings, transportation initiatives and extra-curricular activities.”

The announcement comes after months of complaints related to the district’s transportation system, with some parents saying buses are late or don’t come at all.

It was 20 years ago that the Ohio Supreme Court found the state’s system of funding public schools unconstitutional. The case was brought by a coalition of hundreds of school districts and named after student Nathan DeRolph. They argued that relying on property taxes for school funding unfairly favored districts with higher property values. The Court agreed. The DeRolph decision was one of many attempts to solve a funding problem, and it won’t be the last.

Wright State University
K. Shimada/Wikimedia Commons

Wright State University recently released the long-awaited results from a 2015 audit into the school’s finances and potential conflicts of interest. School officials commissioned the audit following the opening of an ongoing federal investigation into Wright State’s alleged mishandling of international work visas.

Wright State University
K. Shimada/Wikimedia Commons

Students and Faculty at Wright State University are set to protest the University’s financial decisions Friday during a Board of Trustees meeting.

Protesters will march from Wright State’s quad to the student union, where the Board of Trustees will meet to discuss the school’s ongoing budget crisis. Wright State is set to overspend its budget this year by 40 million dollars. The university has cut faculty, staff and programs to rectify the situation. Wright State’s interim president Curtis McCray has said more cuts are coming.

What Do Kids Need to Get to School Every Day?

Mar 20, 2017

Students who miss a lot school fall behind. It seems logical, but it’s still a national problem.

Each year, between 5 and 7.5 million U.S. children are considered chronically absent. In Ohio, 15.8 percent of students miss 10 percent of the school year—about 18 days. That adds up to nearly four weeks of school missed.

WYSO/Joshua Chenault

Wright State University’s incoming president plans to make financial sustainability one of her top priorities. The school’s board of trustees Monday voted unanimously to elect Dr. Cheryl B. Schrader as Wright State’s seventh president.

 

Schrader will be the first woman to hold the position in Wright State’s history. She currently serves as chancellor at Missouri University of Science and Technology.

 

After the vote, Schrader outlined her plans to students and faculty.

 

New DPS Virtual E-School Aimed At High-Risk Students

Feb 27, 2017
The Ohio Supreme Court is considering the role of the school bus driver for student safety.
Wikimedia

Beginning this spring, Dayton Public high school students will be able to complete their studies online. The new Dayton Innovation Virtual Academy e-school is aimed at students who have already dropped out of school, or are at-risk of dropping out. DPS officials this week began a series of meetings to educate parents about the program and explain how to enroll their children.

DPS officials say 150 former students have so far been contacted, in hopes of encouraging them to return to the district.

Kasich Calling For $200M Increase To Education Budget

Jan 26, 2017
Office of Governor John Kasich

Gov. John Kasich and lawmakers are about to go full speed ahead into another budget season where state leaders will likely have to find ways to cut back. But Kasich is insisting they increase funding in at least one area.

Kasich says he’s asking lawmakers to approve a 1% budget increase to K-12 education funding. That’s a nearly $200 million increase over the next two years.

Kasich made the announcement while honoring a handful of schools for their innovative approach to teaching kids, such as working with doctors.

April Laissle

The Dayton School Board Tuesday voted to delay further staff layoffs until next summer.

 

The district first announced plans to cut staff in October, citing what officials called an "unexpected" decline in enrollment. Several administrative staff members were cut and nearly two dozen teachers were reassigned to other classrooms or laid off.

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