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Education

More Online Charter Schools Struggle To Keep Track Of Student Learning Hours

Aug 30, 2016
The Ohio Departmente. of Education is pushing for updated safety plans for schools around the state
Ohio Department of Education

A look at several online charter school attendance reviews reveal that more e-schools might be either unable or unwilling to meet the standards the state has set to prove students are learning. 

For weeks, the state has been battling with its largest online charter school, the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow or ECOT, over how it records the number of hours its more than 15,000 students spend learning. Those hours are critical to the funding of ECOT and all charter schools.

ECOT

The Ohio Department of Education wants to know how much learning is actually going on among the more than 17,000 students at the state’s largest online charter school, ECOT. Some of the school's students are taking a stand. 

18 year old Gabriel Young is featured in one of ECOT’s latest commercials, in which he states, “I was adopted for seven years and then put back.”

Young lives on his own, and says ECOT’s flexible system fits his schedule. And he adds that the work students do can’t always be tracked through log-in information.

tncountryfan / Flickr/Creative Commons

Once again, kids are going back to school in Ohio. And once again, a state lawmaker is saying that school shouldn’t be starting in the middle of August.

Former Ohio Governor, Ted Strickland
Wikimedia Commons

The Democratic candidate for US Senate is calling for a halt to the creation of private, for profit charter schools.

Democratic former Governor Ted Strickland held a campaign event with the state’s two large teachers’ unions, saying he is tired of high stakes testing and bureaucratic regulations of public school teachers. Afterward, he told reporters he also wants a moratorium on for profit charter schools.

“I’m opposed to for profit charter schools because I do not believe educating our kids should become a for profit activity.”

Teachers, school administrators, lawmakers and others are preparing to participate in Ohio's first charter school summit.

The two-day event begins Thursday in Columbus. It is designed to provide opportunities to take financial, professional and academic training; to listen to national experts; and to learn more about board governance, record-keeping and best enrollment practices.

Republican State Auditor Dave Yost is hosting the event. He says the idea is an expansion on trainings his staff has been providing to charter schools.

SCA Svenska Cellulosa Aktiebolaget / Flickr

For the first time in years, Ohio has fallen behind most of the country when it comes to comes to caring for its kids. That’s according to annual Kids Count Data Book released by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

Central State University

In this WYSO Weekend excerpt, Central State University's Edwina Blackwell-Clark outlines a program that will train young, minority males in coding,  3D design, and Entrepreneurship this summer. See more details below.

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There are estimates that say one out of 3 adjunct teachers across the country are living in poverty, and the summer months, when most students are on break, are especially tough.

To counter that seasonal economic downturn, 14 Dayton artists are hosting a one-night-only, pop-up art event called Feed the Adjuncts. 

In the following interview from WYSO Weekend, artist and adjunct teacher, Colleen Kelsey, paints a picture of the local landscape for part-time teachers which includes a look at some of the financial challenges adjuncts face. 

tncountryfan / Flickr/Creative Commons

The West Carrollton School District is making budget cuts in response to a levy failure last March.

The district is set to eliminate high school and preschool transportation for the 2016-2017 school year. They’ll also cut an additional $215,000 from school services.  

Superintendent Dr. Rusty Clifford said they tried to ensure their cuts did not affect the quality of education.

Dayton school officials want feedback and ideas from parents about ways to improve the district.
facebook.com/DaytonPublicSchools

Dayton Public Schools hosted a town hall meeting last night at the Dayton Boys Preparatory school, just weeks after announcing the departure of Superintendent Lori Ward.

Ward spent the meeting, which was held in partnership with the NAACP, outlining how the district ended up at risk of a state takeover, and how they plan to recover.

“We went through 3 years of almost 150 teachers leaving the district," Ward said to the crowd. "So strategy: all buildings will be staffed with effective teachers and provided high quality on-going professional development.”

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