Education

Jerry Kenney

At El Puente Tutoring Center in the Twin Towers district in Dayton, students are preparing balloons for an experiment. Their instructor, Edgardo Santiago, is a chemical engineer at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. He says the experiment was inspired by a recent post he saw on Facebook that claimed gas from mixing vinegar and baking soda could be used to float birthday balloons.

“A lot of my friends were, ‘Oh yeah, this is such a great idea. I’m going to try it,’ and I’m like, I’m gonna educate you guys,” he said.

Nube with her teenage daughter, Kimberly. latino
Juliet Fromholt / WYSO

Nube’s trying to get her kids out the door to school. Her six-year-old comes running down the stairs; her 15-year-old is up in the bedroom getting dressed. She and her children aren’t even five feet tall, but they fill up the kitchen bustling around trying to eat and get ready.

Nube is a compact woman with a wide smile—and she came a long way to Dayton. We’re not using Nube’s full name because she asked us to withhold it for her protection.

 

“I’m trying to forget about this forever”

Dayton's Belmont High School has become a hub for Latino students.
Ariel Van Cleave / WYSO

In the process of reporting the Graduating Latino series, WYSO found out that Latino students who attend private schools in Dayton have a better chance at success than their public school counterparts and there are a few reasons why.

When Laura Yuqui first arrived in Dayton, she sent her son Jason to one of the city’s public elementary schools. And as she explained through an interpreter, things didn’t go well.

Students have a chance to get help with school through the outreach program. hispanic springfield latino
Scott Marshall / Springfield City Schools

Most recently on Graduating Latino, we visited Trotwood-Madison schools to learn about challenges for Latino students. Now we head to Clark County, where the number of kids identified as Hispanic doubled from 2002 to 2012. The Springfield City School District is reaching outside of the classroom to help families succeed.

Creative Commons

It’s the second year of Ohio’s Third Grade Reading Guarantee. All third graders are required to pass a reading test Tuesday in order to move to fourth grade—but not everyone is happy with this new system.

Kindergarten teacher Elly Mallen leads her class through a lesson on saying numbers and months in Spanish.
Ariel Van Cleave / WYSO

About a quarter of the students who attend Ruskin Elementary School on the east side of Dayton’s don’t speak English as their first language. Of the 11 different languages spoken at the school, Spanish is the most prevalent—and it was the Latino students who inspired the staff at Ruskin to take a different approach to teaching. The school is in its third year of a successful dual language program.
 

This week kicks off our series, Graduating Latino, a look at education for Latino students in the Miami Valley.

In much of the Miami Valley the Latino population has gone from about 2 percent in the mid-2000s, to 4 percent now. Around half the local Latino population is from Mexico, which means the other half represent a big cross-section: many Puerto Ricans, and people from Central and South America. The population is a mix of foreign-born and U.S.-born representing a diverse set of experiences.

Ohio Senate Takes Up Charter Reform

Apr 6, 2015
State Senator Peggy Lehner heads the Senate Education Committee.
OhioHouseGOP / Flickr/Creative Commons

 Now that the Ohio House has passed a bill aimed at reforming charter schools, the Senate will take up the issue. The head of the Senate Education committee says she is deeply concerned about the number of poorly performing charters.

The House bill would stop charter sponsors from selling services to the schools they oversee; the Senate is expected to go further and lay out the duties and limits of both sponsors and the operating companies who manage the schools.  

Educators Focus On 'Brain Based' Curriculum For Kids In Poverty

Mar 27, 2015
Mark Urycki / StateImpact Ohio

In January, an analysis of federal data found that for the first time in at least 50 years more than half of the public school children in America are living in poverty. In Ohio, the number is only 39 percent, but it still concerns school officials here who know that poor kids come to school carrying extra burdens. In recent years education officials have been looking to brain research for answers. 

Educators call them “stressed” kids and brain research predicts that children under stress will have a more difficult time learning and behaving.  

House Panel OKs New Charter School Regulations, Reporting

Mar 25, 2015
Ohio statehouse
thoth188

A bill cracking down on low-performing Ohio charter schools and imposing a host of new accountability standards on sponsors has cleared its first legislative hurdle.

After extensive debate and several rounds of revisions, the Ohio House Education Committee approved the bill 13-6 Wednesday. A House vote could come Thursday.

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