WYSO

Education

Of the 600-plus public school districts in Ohio, more than three-quarters have open enrollment policies. That means they accept and educate students who live outside of their district boundaries.

Open enrollment was implemented by state lawmakers nearly 30 years ago to increase options for parents and students, an early example of school choice, but for some districts, it’s creating financial hardship and new instances of segregation.

Liberty Schools Tries to Staunch Flow of Students and Money

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A recent WYSO investigation revealed thousands of kindergarten through third grade students are suspended each year. State data also show school officials remove children of color from the classroom much more often than white children.

A new WYSO analysis of state education data reveals tens of thousands of students across the state are removed from school before the fourth grade for minor discipline issues.

To address these high rates, lawmakers have proposed prohibiting teachers from suspending younger students for lesser offenses. WYSO’s Jess Mador spoke with producer April Laissle to learn more about the legislation.

Zakiya Sankara-Jabar and her son Amir
Zakiya Sankara-Jabar / WYSO

A new WYSO analysis of state education data show Ohio school officials issued over 30,000 suspensions to kindergarten through third-grade students during the 2016 school year. In Dayton, the same data show hundreds of younger students are removed from classrooms each year.

More than 140,000 Ohio students are preparing to enter their senior year of high school, but for thousands of them, the year won’t end with a walk across a stage in a cap and gown. That is unless lawmakers move the graduation goal post once again.

It’s a lingering question that’s creating uncertainty for rising seniors in the state’s high schools.

Ja’Mya and Kenmore-Garfield’s Class of 2019

Sixteen-year-old Ja’Mya Goley is about a month away from starting her senior year at Kenmore-Garfield High School in Akron.

Flickr Creative Commons User Adam Kiefaber

The sheriff of Butler County has taken out a billboard ad criticizing a local district's school security.

The Hamilton-Middletown Journal-News reports the ad by Butler County Sheriff Richard Jones questions the safety provided by the Hamilton school board.

Jones says the board isn't transparent and doesn't "talk to the public." Former Hamilton City Schools Superintendent Tony Orr agreed to a separation agreement in April that was based on an unreleased report into claims he broke district policies.

Clark State Community College

Clark State Community College will offer its first four-year degree starting next year.

 The college in Springfield announced recently that it has received state approval to offer a bachelor's degree in manufacturing technology management.

Clark State President Jo Alice Blondin says the program will allow people currently working in the manufacturing industry to learn new skills and prepare for advancement.

Wright State university WSU board of trustees debate nutter center fairborn
Jess Mador / WYSO

Wright State University’s Board of Trustees officially approved the school’s 2019 budget at a meeting Friday. The plan includes another round of layoffs. It's the latest chapter in the school's months-long effort to avoid being placed on state fiscal watch.

Wright State President Cheryl Schrader says as many as 40 positions could be eliminated during the coming fiscal year beginning July 1. She says some of those cuts could come through attrition.

Schrader speaks at a 2017 welcome reception shortly after being named Wright State's president.
April Laissle / WYSO

Wright State University President Cheryl Schrader today announced the school is set to add millions of dollars to its cash reserves this year. But that may not be enough to keep the school off the state’s fiscal watch list.

In an email to campus this morning, Schrader said the school is projected to add $7.2M to its reserve fund this fiscal year. That’s $1.2M more than Wright State officials said would be needed to avoid state watch earlier this year.

Police say a 12-year-old boy who had a loaded handgun in his backpack at his Moraine school has been taken into custody.

Sgt. Jon Spencer with the Moraine police tells the Dayton Daily News that officers were called to the Montgomery County Learning Center in Moraine around 8 a.m. Monday. Spencer says staff members were notified of the weapon and recovered it from the student. No injuries were reported.

It is unclear why the student brought the weapon to school.

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