Early childhood education

tncountryfan / Flickr/Creative Commons

 

The state of Ohio recently allotted $9.1 million to fund mental health services for kids kindergarten age and younger. It’s all part of a larger effort to prevent these kids from getting expelled or suspended from school.

Bari Krause works with children at risk of expulsion as a mental health care counselor for Catholic Charities of Southwestern Ohio.  

Last week, she worked with a 2-year-old who was having a hard-time listening to his teacher.

The Ohio Supreme Court is considering the role of the school bus driver for student safety.
Wikimedia

An Ohio initiative is seeking to boost access mental health consultants in an effort to curb the number of children expelled or suspended from kindergarten, preschool and other early childhood education settings.

The state's Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services says 75 counties are expected to benefit from $9.1 million set aside in the state's two-year budget to help fund the initiative. Up to 64 mental health consultants will work with teachers and at-risk students in early learning programs such as Head Start and preschool.

Experts Say Child's First 2,000 Days Critical To Development

Oct 19, 2015
Mark Urycki / State Impact Ohio

The new Ohio budget contains an extra $25 million aimed at providing high quality preschool experience for low income children. It’s a tiny amount compared to the number of pre-school children in Ohio. But some local districts are putting up money of their own. From President Obama down to local officials there is new interest in investing in childhood development from an early age. 

Lead Teacher, Amanda Looney (Left), fellow teachers, and kids gather at Twin Towers Head Start to eat lunch.
Jerry Kenney

It’s pretty much accepted by education researchers that preschool attendance has positive long term effects—people who go to preschool are more likely to be successful in K-12 education and to adapt socially to being around other kids. Yet, preschool numbers for Latino kids nationally and in Ohio are lower than other ethnic groups. 

The Educational Track

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

A national coalition of law enforcement officials is calling on Congress to fully fund preschool programs for low-income kids. Over 30 Ohio police chiefs, sheriffs and prosecutors have signed a letter to Congress asking legislators to pass President Obama’s proposal to put $75 billion into early childhood education over ten years. They say it would ultimately pay itself off in the reduced costs of incarceration.